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The first night of class I ask that people tell me if their dog has a problem with people or dogs. (I don't define "problem", sometimes >people will own to a problem if it isn't labelled aggression.)

Well, and a problem isn't always going to BE aggression. Brenin's discomfort with dogs getting in his face, worry about dogs of breeds which had attacked him in the past, or worry about strange men approaching the fence, wasn't aggression.
Nor, IMO, does a response which consists of a normal "Back Off!" communication - with no intent to actually use teeth - constitute aggression.
There's also the fact that a "problem" could be a fear of a specific breed, fear of men in hats, a tendency to be too friendly, etc.
Humor is funny to most people. You should lighten up a little. I have never met a boxer with a bad disposition, so I was surprised to hear about yours.
After you've checked with the other dogs' owner(s) and gotten permission, yes? It's only polite.

Why are you surprised? Anyone who knows anything at all ... come from the same basic foundation stock as Pit Bulls.

I've got two adolescent boy-Boxers in class now. The brindle is very bouncy, very loud (whining, screaming, barking) because he ... bent about? He ignores the Dachsie, but the two boys who are about his size and confidence level? Game on.==

Everyone walks their dogs off leash in this particular place. If I see a potential problem, I immediately put my dog on the leash and make her sit until the problem has passed by. I also walk at a time early in the morning, when most times I don't meet anyone. When we do meet people and their dogs, they are the same people that we have met before.
The thread is specifically about identifying dog aggressive animals before admitting them to group classes. Tangentially, the subject of dog ... apparently think is "really funny"). Unless your dog is dog aggressive, your post makes absolutely no sense in this context.

I disagree. The point which pfoley originally made was about how stress (in a group class setting) can cause a dog to act in ways it normally wouldn't, to which Mary responded about how her dogs reacted in class, and how she worked through it. I chimed in about my experience as well, and I don't think either Mary or I were writing specifically about dog aggressive dogs and the necessity for them to deal with conditions of stress in an acceptable manner, but about all dogs being able to do so.
So you really have no point in posting about your dog in this thread, period.

Ummm...pfoley is perfectly at liberty to post in what seems to be a topic tangential to the original thread.
Why are you surprised? Anyone who knows anything at all about Boxers would not be surprised that many of them are dog aggressive.

Yup. They are among the breeds I am most watchful of at the dog park. Most recent was an adolescent Boxer, who had been coming for months with no problems, but then started going after other young males. They had to stop coming to the dog park entirely because the behavior escalated to an unacceptable level within a span of a couple of weeks.

Suja
Mary Healey (Email Removed) said in
The first night of class I ask that people tell me if their dog has a problem with people or dogs. (I don't define "problem", sometimes people will own to a problem if it isn't labelled aggression.)

We use "issue" and group it in with a litany of other things, including food allergies. People are usually pretty up front with their dog's issues, including "shy" dogs.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Yup. They are among the breeds I am most watchful of at the dog park.

Ditto, until we get to know them. And if they're younger than about 2, I still keep an eye until they've matured.
Most recent was an adolescent Boxer, who had been coming for months with no problems, but then started going after ... the dog park entirely because the behavior escalated to an unacceptable level within a span of a couple of weeks.

And ditto again, except that it was a female who targeted smaller dogs, starting when she hit about 13 months.
As with most bull breeds, that's the classic pattern with Boxers; even if the dog has played with other dogs as puppies, when they reach adolescence, they frequently start having issues with others of the same sex that they percieve as challenges or threats. And if the females go that way, they're worse than the males.
Not all of them do, especially if their owners actually bother to put some training on them, but IME the majority tend that way.
Yup. They are among the breeds I am most watchful of at the dog park.

Ditto, until we get to know them. And if they're younger than about 2, I still keep an eye until they've matured.
Most recent was an adolescent Boxer, who had been coming for months with no problems, but then started going after ... the dog park entirely because the behavior escalated to an unacceptable level within a span of a couple of weeks.

And ditto again, except that it was a female who targeted smaller dogs, starting when she hit about 13 months.
As with most bull breeds, that's the classic pattern with Boxers; even if the dog has played with other dogs as puppies, when they reach adolescence, they frequently start having issues with others of the same sex that they percieve as challenges or threats. And if the females go that way, they're worse than the males.
Not all of them do, especially if their owners actually bother to put some training on them, but IME the majority tend that way.
I've got two adolescent boy-Boxers in class now.

Oh my.
The brindle is very bouncy, very loud (whining, screaming, barking) because he wants to interact with the other dogs. The owner says he wants to play, and mostly that seems to be true. He's rumbled at the other Boxer.

That's normal. Even Boxers who ultimately get along with Dog X will rumble at them at the beginning. Other dogs tend to be taken aback by it, as I'm sure you've noticed!
The fawn dog has decided Ranger Must Die, he's thinking that maybe the first Boxer needs a smackdown, and his owner is about to expire of embarassment.

Understandably, but what do you do? The behavior can be mitigated by training (ask Miss Brown), but until that point, you've got a bona fide Crazy Dawg on your hands.
Both are what I'd consider to be "typical" Boxers great with people, mostly fine with girldogs, pondering world domination around boydogs.

That sounds about right. On the bright side, they aren't girls.
And that's what the fawn Boxer's problem is. Ranger's male. The other Boxer is male. There's a male Dachsie in ... bent about? He ignores the Dachsie, but the two boys who are about his size and confidence level? Game on.

Textbook, that is. Dog-aggression is common in Boxers, and same-sex aggression is the most common of all, with female-female aggression usually more serious than male-male. (I know you know that, but Pfoley seems not to have clue number one about Boxers.)

Shelly
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You have to systematically create confusion, it sets creativity free. Everything that is contradictory creates life.
Salvador Dali
Humor is funny to most people. You should lighten up a little.

Mileage must vary, because while Mary is generally humorous, the post in question was not what I'd call "really funny." Certainly not to the extent that that's the only response I'd've had to it.
I have never met a boxer with a bad disposition, so I was surprised to hear about yours.

It's not a bad disposition. It's a common breed trait, you maroon.

Shelly
http://www.cat-sidh.net (the Mother Ship)
http://esther.cat-sidh.net (Letters to Esther)
If you see a tree as blue, then make it blue.
Paul Gauguin
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