The discussion in another thread about knowledge needed to teach basic obed. classes got me thinking about the difference between the formal curriculum and the real business of teaching entry-level training. Sit, Down, Stay, etc. are lovely and useful things, but meaningless if a dog finishes a class without knowing
1. Where to potty
2. To wait for attention
3. What to chew/play with
4. How to meet new people & dogs
5. How to pass time alone

Anybody who has a bulging toolbox of different approaches that their clients can use in their own homes for those things is doing a good job, regardless of how sloppy their instruction of the traditional obedience signals might be. The reverse is also true, of course. People whose dogs have problems in any of the Big 5 are going to expect solutions from a trainer. Nobody should put themselves in the position to be asked if they don't have lots of answers that they know will work.
It seems to me that the Big 5 list answers a lot of other questions, too. Things like What does every dog need to know? and What do foster homes have to teach a rescue dog before adoption? I'm thinking of re-doing our rescue's Fosterer's Manual along those lines.

Lynn K.
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1. Where to potty

I think this can be better addressed as where "not" to potty. I don't care where Rusty potties, as long as it's outside *somewhere.*

Emily Carroll
Fluttervale Labradors: www.fluttervale.com
CPG: www.geocities.com/cyberpetgame/
The discussion in another thread about knowledge needed to teach basic obed. classes got me thinking about the difference between the formal curriculum and the real business of teaching entry-level training.Hear! Hear!

A well-socialized dog is what most people want. Basic obed. may feed into that (like a musician practicing scales), or it may not.
All dogs pretty much need to be taught how to meet people (ie a sit until released or anything that doesn't include jumping up for most pet owners) but meeting other dogs is a strange one. I think most dogs are born with this ability because its not something most people have to actively teach. There are certainly some breeds though (and obviously some individual dog exceptions) who *do* need active instruction about this. I'm talking breeds with known dog-aggression issues as well as breeds who are highly territorial and then those who are just too physical.

Is there a tips & tricks article/document somewhere that addresses this specific issue outside of the breeder's obligation to insure alot of puppy/dog interaction? Boxers, as an example, tend to be either too physical with strange dogs or iffy upon meeting a strange dog. What method works for one tends to not work for the other. I believe I'm probably most targeting the kind of training methods used for non-puppies here.

Tara
1. Where to potty

I think this can be better addressed as where "not" to potty. Idon't care where Rusty potties, as long as it's outside *somewhere.*

I think the same. It took Dibs, a rescue dog , a couple of months to be trustworthy indoors so I'm just pleased he goes outside. If he poos on the pavement on a walk, I bag it and drop it in a dog poo bin. It's handy to have a dog that can go on command but it can cause problems if a dog won't go on a particular surface (such as a dog being left at boarding kennels and won't go on the concrete run) Alison
A well-socialized dog is what most people want. Basic obed. may feed into that (like a musician practicing scales), or it may not.

I'd guess maybe 20% of my students enroll specifically to socialize their dogs. Most complain about play-nipping, jumping, pulling on leash, or the dog not listening to them.
PetsMart Pet Trainer
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All dogs pretty much need to be taught how to meet people (ie a sit until released or anything that ... one. I think most dogs are born with this ability because its not something most people have to actively teach.

Maybe I could have phrased it better as "how to behave around strangers (human & canine)". I didn't mean that every dog should come out of a basic obedience class as a dog that can go to an off-leash dog park. But I'd hope that he/she could go into a public place, on lead with his owner, where there might be other dogs with their owners. I don't care about play style or how the dog feels about other dogs so much as whether or not the dog knows how to behave in those situations.
Lynn K.
I think this can be better addressed as where "not" to potty. I don't care where Rusty potties, as long as it's outside *somewhere.*

So for you, where to potty is a big area on the other side of the door known as "outside" :-) Ian Dunbar tells a story about being nervous that his male Malamute, Omaha, would mark the 1st time he took him to a training facility - a big empty space with lots of urine smells from other dogs. So, everytime he took the dog out to potty he said "outside" as they went through the door, and "inside" as they came back in. That way, he could denote the training building as a non-potty area by saying "inside" as they entered the building.

Lynn K.
I think this can be better addressed as where "not" to potty. I don'tcare where Rusty potties, as long as it's outside *somewhere.*

So for you, where to potty is a big area on the other side of the door known as "outside" ... That way, he could denote the training building as a non-potty area by saying "inside" as they entered the building.

Neat concept.
I denote "potty time" by telling him to "go potty." He seems to recognize the difference between inside and outside fairly well he didn't want to potty even at Cobo Hall in Detroit, even while we were breaking everything down.

Emily Carroll
Fluttervale Labradors: www.fluttervale.com
CPG: www.geocities.com/cyberpetgame/
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