As a city dweller, I find that the lack of backyard is a killer. It's a lot more difficult to let him go potty, and there is no yard to 'dogsit' him. Without a creative solution, the dog takes over your life. I mean, one is constantly waiting to do the next walk!!
True?!
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We live in the suburbs and have an acre of land, but on a busy road with no fence (and no plans or funds for a fence). With a not-too-bright dog that took over a year to housetrain, it was a constant vigil for the next pee or poo, which he would refuse to do on a walk, btw. I know what you mean. It added a lot of stress to my life.
As a city dweller, I find that the lack of backyard is a killer. It's a lot more difficult to let him go potty, and there is no yard to 'dogsit' him.[/nq]I have a rather large yard. It is unfenced. I have one dog that I will not trust off leash, so I leash him up and go out with him when he needs to go out. I went out with him in the snow last night about 5 times (9:00, 11:00, 1:30, 4:15, 6:30). Each time, it took him about 20 minutes to be done. I suspect that both of us would be in the same shoes when this sort of thing happens. The other dog is completely trustworthy off leash.

However, if you just stick her out the door, she'll stand there, trying to get back in. She wants her humans to go out there with her, although we don't have to walk right next to her. FYI, even if my yard were fenced in, they will still go on walks - it is important to me that they remain well socialized, are constantly exposed to new things, etc.
Without a creative solution, the dog takes over your life. I mean, one is constantly waiting to do the next walk!! True?!

I don't know about you, but I'm not so busy or important that I can't spare a couple of hours out of my day to take care of my dogs. If the dogs weren't in my life, I would be spending that time being unproductive anyway, and this way I at least get out of the house and stretch my legs, get to meet other people and their dogs, etc. Just yesterday, DH and I were talking about how much less interesting our lives would be without the dogs. The positives far outweigh the negatives as far as I am concerned. Your experiences and outlook may differ from mine, of course.
Suja
As a city dweller, I find that the lack of backyard is a killer.It's a lot more difficult to let ... a creative solution, the dog takes over your life. I mean,one is constantly waiting to do the next walk!! True?!

Hi Rich ,
It's not until you get a dog that you realise how hard it can be and it must be extra hard not having a yard. I expect some dogs end up in shelters because of it. In the UK, many rescues won't rehome a dog if there is no garden, though some take each case on merit . I have a garden (yard) myself which is fortunate as Dibby my dog has collitis and often has to go in the early hours. I wouldn't fancy having to take him into the street in me jimjams ! Alison
As a city dweller, I find that the lack of backyard is a killer. It's a lot more difficult to let him go potty, and there is no yard to 'dogsit' him.

Most dogs bred to be pets aren't happy left alone outside, so it's probably for the best that you don't have a yard to use as a dogsitter.

Without a creative solution, the dog takes over your
life. I mean, one is constantly waiting to do the next walk!! True?!

Not true. Not in my case anyway. If you see owning a dog as a clockwatching activity, it might not be the thing for you.
Cate
So?
Sorry, that sounded sarcastic, but I got my dog to be part of my life. I enjoy him. I enjoy walking him. I enjoy training him. I enjoy feeding, brushing, grooming, and playing with him. It's a lot like kids - if you don't enjoy the responsibility, don't bother! (btw - kids and dogs at the same time can be a real bonus. There's almost nothing cuter than a 4 year old having a dog who outweighs him by 40 pounds do cute little tricks.)

That being said, I have lived in apartments with dogs, with no yards, and found that it did not, indeed, take over my life. I was able to incorporate the walk schedule into my life, and that's different. It all depends on your dog, your schedule, your neighborhood, etc. etc. etc. Once you get your routine, you're all set. The hardest part is figuring out the routine that works for both you and your dog.
Don't, however, get a dog if you're not willing to compromise to his routine a little bit.
-Shannon
Exactly.
Though I wouldn't exclude city dwellers completely.
As a city dweller, I find that the lack of backyard is a killer. It's alot more difficult to let ... creative solution, the dog takes over your life. I mean, one is constantly waiting to do the next walk!! True?!

You seem to keep asking the same question over and over again. Most, if not all of the people on this group, are happy to care for their pets, have choosen to make whatever efforts they need to in order to have a pet, and don't view pet ownership as a punishment. Are you hoping for a different answer? Or do you just crave attention?
As a city dweller, I find that the lack of backyard is a killer. It's alot more difficult to let ... creative solution, the dog takes over your life. I mean, one is constantly waiting to do the next walk!! True?!

Yes, in a sense it is true. When you get a dog as a pet, it is a member of your family, and it is not an independent familymember that can take care of itself - you have to take care of it. So if you don't have much sparetime, or don't want to "waste" it on walking the dog then don't get one. A yard isn't really any solution either, an only dog usually needs more exercise than it gets while sniffing around in the yard.
For me a day without my dogs is hard, not just because I miss them and the apartment seems empty - but also because I never get to bed. I can sit in front of the tv or computer and suddenly realise that I haven't gone to bed because I haven't walked the dogs yet! For me the day isn't over before I know the dogs have been walked.
So if you want a pet but feel like a dog is too much work, how about some kind of pet that doesn't need to be walked? Cats and ferrets are other possible pets that, as far as I know, don't necessarily need walking. Bunnies aren't as stupid as people think (not all of them anyway), they can be quite cuddly, and even welcome you when you get home! Bunnies can learn some tricks too, and are not that hard to get housetrained. Bunnies also come in all sizes and shapes, and can live for 10 years. If you get a cage big enough, you don't even have to feel bad about leaving a bunny alone for 10h a day either, as long as you play with it when you get home. Maybe worth looking into?
Rosa
(Who would love to get a bunny, but who has a SO who hates small critters)
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