We got a Happy Hut for our 4 month old lovebird. We hung it from the top of the cage and for awhile he didnt know what to do with it ( or his toys yet, for that matter ).
So I had the idea that if I made it easier for him to get in and out of, he might use it. So I put one of the perches up perpendicular to the hole line of the Happy Hut, so he could walk along the perch and enter the Happy Hut from one end, and easily walk out the other end when he wanted to exit.
It took a few days, and then one night we came in and saw his little head looking out of the Happy Hut at us. It was so cute!

So now he likes hanging out in there, but there might be a problem. Maybe it's TOO comfy. We came home today and found him hanging out in there in the middle of the day. This isn't going to make a lazy bird out of him is it?
Like maybe he'll want to hang out in the Happy Hut all day, watch his little TV and eat birdie bon bons?
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We got a Happy Hut for our 4 month old lovebird. We hung it from the top of the cage ... he'll want to hang out in the Happy Hut all day, watch his little TV and eat birdie bon bons?

Are you sure it's a he? if it's a she, it may start to want to make a nest and get real aggressive about it. If you want him/her to interact with you, this could be a problem. Play it by ear a while and see what happens.
"Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks."
(Lazarus Long)
We got a Happy Hut for our 4 month old ... day, watch his little TV and eat birdie bon bons?

Are you sure it's a he? if it's a she, it may start to want to make a nest and ... happens. "Everything in excess! To enjoy the flavor of life, take big bites. Moderation is for monks." (Lazarus Long)

Absolutely right on the nesting thing - I fostered a rescue female lovebird for a few months while trying to find a forever home for her. She happened to have a Happy Hut and would be in it all* day and presumably *all night when she was in egg-laying mode. Of course, she was on a tear too - ).,i.e., tearing up paper strips right and left. She would tear up newspaper and take it into the hut with her.I allowed her free flight time too and she would tear up anything that looked good to her, sticking it under her wings, as lovebirds do, then trying to fly with the strips sticking out - funny! I ended up having just a big pile of scrap paper for her to tear up since she was going to tear stuff up anyway. She did cost me two library books (had to buy them) though when she went really wayward one day unbeknownst to me (her cage door had not latched properly so she had fun while we were at work).

Became really aggressive as well during these times. Obviously, I took out the hut. Incidentally, she did end up laying about three eggs during her time with me. She went to a home with a male peachface so hopefully she found birdy bliss with him.
Lovebirds are great when you have a one-on-one relationship with a single bird that is handled frequently, but I know that my preference is definitely for other birds such as my Greys and my parakeets.
(snip)
Lovebirds are great when you have a one-on-one relationship with a single bird that is handled frequently, but I know that my preference is definitely for other birds such as my Greys and my parakeets.

Thea, how long do parakeets live?
(snip)

Lovebirds are great when you have a one-on-one relationship with ... for other birds such as my Greys and my parakeets.

Thea, how long do parakeets live?[/nq]Well, I suspect Linda A. can answer that question as well as I can, or better, since she seems to be quite knowledgeable as well. However, I think the average life span is around ten to fifteen years in captivity - not sure about the Aussie varieties, flying free : - ). But there are definitely reports of oldtimers in captivity who reach 20/22 years or even more, occasionally. With optimum care, and barring the diagnosis of the tumors that tend to plague parakeets, I would have expectation of a reasonably long life, at least a dozen years and more! The unfortunate thing is that because 'keets are considered disposable birds, they probably die much sooner than they need to due to lack of vet care and less than optimum care from the start.

And of course, they tend to escape more readily since they are excellent fliers and so small - one of mine was found this past summer at a pool.
I've had parakeets in the past (twenty years or so ago) but am just now getting back into them. My five are all rescues or re-homes and I know that at least four of them are still relatively young (a year or less) while one is very likely older, but how old is speculative - she has no bars showing at all on her head. I enjoy watching them interact and while, it's great to have them bond with me and have a 'pet' keet who perches on my finger or shoulder and wants to be with me, I recognize that's unlikely in a small flock like I have. And that's fine since I'm quite happy to allow them to just be birds, doing their bird thing, who learn to be content with me in their proximity.
Enough of my rambling - I tend to be more verbose than necessary : - )!

T.
Thea, how long do parakeets live?

Well, I suspect Linda A. can answer that question as well as I can, or better, since she seems to ... in their proximity. Enough of my rambling - I tend to be more verbose than necessary : - )! T.

~~
Hi Thea:
About budgie longevity, I really have a mixed bag of thoughts on this. I'm no expert, but I've owned birds all of my life, keeping several species, budgies among them. At the moment, I have 21 budgies, most of which are rescues or someone else's throwaways.
My oldest budgie, Toby, is about ten years old, having gotten him as a young chick. The rest of my budgies are most likely in the 5/6/7 year range. As mentioned, I took in these birds from friends who owned a pet store, so really have no idea how old they are. I have a couple of elderly budgie hens that I adopted as well, probably close to ten years of age. As well, I helped raise five baby budgies that were born over the last two years or so.I've had young (4-5 years old) budgies die on me unexpectedly with no warning, i.e., no outward signs of illness at all except for perhaps some lethargy. If I recall correctly, a few of those budgies who died suddenly were English budgies. Last winter I had to put one of my female budgies, Pansy, to sleep because she had a hernia that was inoperable. She was about three years old. When I was at the vet with Pansy, the vet told me that 50% of budgies born today have congenital defects, including tumours.

The avian vet also told me that if a budgie makes it to about 7 years of age in robust health, there's a very good chance that the budgie will live to at least ten years of age or even older. That's my own personal feeling as well. Budgies that live into their mid-teens are exceptional, IMHO. The budgies that have died on me were perhaps 5 years of age or thereabouts. I think overbreeding plays a big part in mortality, as well as a poor diet, lack of exercise as well as lack of stimulation.

Budgies are my favourite little guys, one of the reasons why I'd love for them to live as long as possible. It seems, though, that the odds may be stacked against them in the longevity department.

LindaA
http://brightlion.com/InHope/InHope en.aspx
"In Hope, An Animal Shelter Story"
(warning: graphic content)
Be part of the solution, not part of the problem
... please spay or neuter your pets
I've got a Sun Conure and a Hawkhead and they both love the huts. They're both males. The Hawkhead sleeps in his, and I've occasionally seen him nap in there during the day, but other than that he's not in it. It was about the same with the conure, except he liked to take his fruit in there and make a yucky mess of it. So now he has one of the Cozy Corner things which he can kind of snuggle into, but doesn't have a bottom to hold stuff.
I don't buy the commercial ones anymore, as they do like to chew them. So I buy cheap fleece or fake fur and make a bunch.
~~ Hi Thea: About budgie longevity, I really have a mixed bag of thoughts on this. I'm no expert, but ... (warning: graphic content) Be part of the solution, not part of the problem ... please spay or neuter your pets

Thanks, Linda. I knew you would have a more succinct response since you've had more experience with them than I have. I, too, like these little birds and if you don't mind, wonder if it's ok to email you directly for general feedback on your experiences with your flock as needed. Feel free to contact me directly via my email addy if you prefer to respond there! It's disappointing to realize that their life span is relatively short and yes, I agree - no doubt, it's due to excessive breeding and other human-created factors. Shame on us!
T.
Thanks!
Thea
Verbose is good. Never be a non-verboser!
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