Now that the puppy is growing some and gaining some confidence, he has taken to barking. Loudly. Indoors. This is not acceptable. I've talked to the trainer about it, but I'm not having much luck. She teaches only positive reinforcement methods. She says to ignore him while he's barking, and then click and treat whenever he stops. She claims that waiting 3 seconds after the last bark will be long enough for him to forget he was barking and only associate the treat with being quiet.
Okay, for the first couple of nights this worked okay. He'd get distracted by the treats and then stay near me and forget about the barking. But he soon learned that in order to get treats, he had to bark, then stop. So the third night it became an incessant game of "bark, bark, bark, bark, bark, (pause)" followed by a click and treat. Then "bark, bark, bark, bark, bark, (pause)" followed by a click and treat, and so on. I tried extending the time he had to be quiet by a little, but that didn't seem to work. He'd stop barking, come over and sit for a treat, then after a few seconds he'd bark some more before trying for the treat again.
Tonight, in desperation, I gave him time outs in the bathroom instead. The time outs were oh, maybe 5 minutes. Yes, I know that at the end of 5 minutes he doesn't have any idea why he was in there, but I don't know what else to do. That seemed to work tonight, but no idea if it will continue to work.
FYI, he barks in the following situations:

1) He wants something that he can't get to.
2) (related) Cassie has something he wants
3) He wants the cat or Cassie to play with him and they won't.
4) He's playing with the cat (well, he thinks he's playing, I'm not surethe cat agrees), and will run up to her, bark a few times, she'll swat at him and he'll run away, and then start over again.

Bizby
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Now that the puppy is growing some and gaining some confidence, he has taken to barking. Loudly. Indoors. This is ... up to her, bark a few times, she'll swat at him and he'll run away, and then start over again.

I taught Pebbles to "hush" but it was only because she was a seriously smart dog and I must've just repeated myself enough times, at the right times, for her to figure it out. I also use a very loud, very short, human-buzzer type noise as a catch-all for "stop doing that right this minute!" and it too seems to work as an interruption. Its catching the pauses in barking to praise that can be a PITA. Dogs barking in the house, if they're doing it at me, get that loud correction and my back turned. When they quiet down I turn back around and issue a "good girl".
What breed(s) is he? That can make a difference. My mother's GSD/wolf mix (fools in Colorodo bred them on purpose) barks so loud and long that its as if its an OCD behavior. Her bark vibrates through you so what's happened is that they've always given her their immediate attention when she barks. Whether to yell at her to stop, to see what she's barkign at and, always, to give in to whatever it is she wants just to shut her up. They've reinforced her barking. She's the sweetest dog and after 11 years they're used to her barking but when we went to visit last month all I wanted was a roll of duct tape to make the dog be quiet.

Tara
Now that the puppy is growing some and gaining some confidence, he has taken to barking. Loudly. Indoors. This is ... to her, bark a few times, she'll swat at him and he'll run away, and then start over again. Bizby[/nq]When Maui was first learning to be quiet, he would do the same thing as Lexi (bark lots then stop and wait for a treat). What I ended up finally doing was keeping a spray bottle near me and whenever he barked, he got one quick spray to the face (avoiding the eyes). I know some people probably really disagree with the use of the spray bottle but with a sleeping baby in the house I was out of ideas and it was only water he was getting sprayed with.

The water kind of stunned him for a second and then I could call him over to me and give him a treat and praise for coming over to me. Then, at different times throughout the day, when he was being quiet, I would say "yes, good quiet" and give him a treat. Later I could just say "quiet" when he was barking and shown him the spray bottle and eventually I could just say "quiet" and he knew what to do.
(Email Removed):
Tonight, in desperation, I gave him time outs in the bathroom instead.

Queenie is a barker, too, and gets very wound up and seems unable to calm down. I think time-outs are great for this. She calms down in there, and then I let her out. I usually make them just a couple of minutes.

Like others here, I sing to the dogs to calm them down as well. I have a made up "we don't bark at the neighbors" song, and also I like Mairsie Doats. This technique works really well for Zoe, and pretty often for Queenie (but not always, thus the time outs).

Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow
& Queenie the black gold retriever
& Rosalie the calico
I believe in positive re-inforcement but sometimes it has it's limits. I wouldn't automatically jump to an ecollar at this point but when all else fails it might be an option. In Ladys case it was the collor either worked or I had to find her a new home back on a farm somewhere.
I have a collie/shepard that came from my sisters farm at the age os 11 months. She wasn't exposed to all the noises she hears in town so we had an issue with barking. I thought we had it licked until she got spooked by the neighbor shoveling snow across the street one night. After that as soon as you'd take her out the door she'd start into barking like a raving fool at any type of noise outside and nothing would shut her up. Finally as a last resort I bought a remote e-collar one that I manually control by hand.

It was the best 95.00 I have ever spent in my life. It took less than two days of verbal commands and few low dose zaps to get her to understand what Quiet means. She still will bark and she is allowed to bark but after a couple yaps when I tell her quiet she listens. The collar also came in handy when she started chasing rabbits now it's no longer an issue.

Celeste
"bizby40" (Email Removed) said in
Now that the puppy is growing some and gaining some confidence, he has taken to barking. Loudly. Indoors. This is not acceptable. I've talked to the trainer about it, but I'm not having much luck. She teaches only positive reinforcement methods.

I've had great success (even with twice-a-week daycare dogs) using negative punishment: Outside, if it's non-play barking or excessive play barking, the dog goes inside. If it's inappropriate inside barking, they get a very short (and consistent) time-out away from the other dogs.
One of the dogs that I've had here twice a week since he was a puppy is apparently an incredible barker (most Mudis seem to be) everywhere but here.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
When Maui was first learning to be quiet, he would do the same thing as Lexi (bark lots then stop ... whenever he barked, he got one quick spray to the face (avoiding the eyes). I know some people probably really

I tried that already (hey, it worked for the cat!), but he looked just a little surprised, and then thought it was a game.

Bizby
Thanks guys. It sounds like the time outs are a good thing to try. Unfortunately most of the barking takes place at night. Or maybe it's fortunate since I'll be motivated to be consistent with discipline. When I say night, I mean, after the kids are in bed, but while I'm still up.

Besides the barking, everything seems to be going well. He's finally caught the knack of the housebreaking thing. He's still a chewer, but the downstairs is pretty much puppy-proofed, as is my bedroom. I'd like to get him out of the crate at night soon, but he doesn't seem quite ready, though he will happily take a nap with me on my bed. At night he jumps down and goes sniffing around for trouble. And my room isn't that puppy-proof there is the alarm clock cord he could chew on for example.

Bizby
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