We adopted Molly 4 days before our daughter came home from vacation. She was very shy, but no growling or anything. Libby came home all was fine for about 5 days. Then Libby dyed her hair and the same day in fact as soon as she was done the growling started. This has been going on 7 days.
Today it has stopped as quickly as it started.
Molly is laying under the coffe table and I was laying on the couch. I got up and usually Molly would follow me down stairs. Well 10 minutes later I go bck up to check on her and Libby is in my spot on the couch and Molly is still under the table by her.
She has not growled at her at all today. Maybe it was the hair dye and hopefully it is over.
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We adopted Molly 4 days before our daughter came home from vacation. She was very shy, but no growling or ... She has not growled at her at all today. Maybe it was the hair dye and hopefully it is over.

I would still take it very slow, and not pressure Molly. But maybe she has decided that Libby belongs to the pack.
I don't think it would have anything to do with the hair dye.

flick 100785
in thread "flick" (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
I don't think it would have anything to do with the hair dye.

I think it could be both, but especially the hair dresser scents.
Taking it very slow. Libby has been told not to try and pet her. Molly will come to her when she is ready.
I don't think it would have anything to do with the hair dye.

I think it could be both, but especially the hair dresser scents.

Do you mean, there was this added scent and the dog didn't realize it was the same person? I thought dogs could distinguish between various scents better than that. She would still smell like herself with the addition of the hairdresser and/or dye scent. Wouldn't she?
flick 100785
Do you mean, there was this added scent and the dog didn't realize it was the same person? I thought ... that. She would still smell like herself with the addition of the hairdresser and/or dye scent. Wouldn't she? flick 100785

I'm not saying she didn't reconize her. I'm saying I think the scent was something the dog didn't like.
in thread "flick" (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
Do you mean, there was this added scent and the dog didn't realize it was the same person? I thought ... that. She would still smell like herself with the addition of the hairdresser and/or dye scent. Wouldn't she? flick 100785

She would, but new scents can disturb a dog. Hell, they disturb me! Just walk into a room with me wearing perfume. I turn into a rabid frothing at the mouth,furious with you, *** with an attitude.

Your perfume reacts like hitting me in the head with a ball bat. My lymph nodes swellup, I feel like I have the flu for three days after, and I get a migraine. YOUR PERFUME PISSES ME OFF!
If you walk behind me in a grocery store with perfume on, I leave the checkout, groceries and all to get away from you. (It takes longer for you to check out, because now the checkout lady has to figure out what to do with this stuff.)
You get *** because YOUR PERFUME causes ME to get sick, and YOU to get inconvenienced.
I know how sick I'm going to be, so I'm *** before I even get sick. You didn't do anything, and you don't understand why I'm glaring daggers at you.
(this really happens..frequently)
OK so I'm telling you how I feel.
We know dogs have allergies, We know they are a TRILLION times more sensitive to scents than we are. The dog can't tell you how he feels. I know when you walk into the room with perfume, (I never met you before in my life) and already I'm stifling the urge to knock your block off.

Now.. tell me exactly what that dog is feeling? Tell me perfumes do not make a difference, or hair care products? I have trained several tracking dogs. I know some tracking dogs that will NOT track humans wearing perfume.

Here is some facts on Scent and the scenting dog.
Dogs have 125-200 MILLION olfactory cells compared to Man's modest 5 Million.
Additionally Their cells are far more efficient by construction. Small slender extensions called cilia (Latin = hairs) protrude from the surface of these olfactory cells. These are bathed in the mucus and appear to be the parts of the cell actually stimulated by odorous molecules. The number of cilia per cell varies among species and appears to be correlated with olfactory sensitivity.
Some examples include:
ANIMAL CILIA per RECEPTOR CELL
minnow 4-6
frog 6-12
rabbit 9-16
rat 15-20
cat 40
human 6-8
dog 100-150
ADDITIONALLY, the Jacobsen's organ also known as the Vomero-nasal area.. It's almost totally absent in Man, and a small spot innervated also by the olfactory nerve but located closer to the nostrils. I know when Danny is seriously tracking because I see him "licking" the are as he works out a problem, fanning air over this area. When he stops, we rework the are. People have asked me why I made him rework and area, and I said when he quit working, he had a mental lapse. I redirected attention back to the problem at hand, and he successfully completed the problem.
Combine this with the turbinule structure of the dog a boney network within the dogs nasal cavity that disturbs incoming air and splits it up so it covers a large mass of the above mentioned mucus covered olfactory cilia. I have a dog skull here, and these turbinules look like a natural sea sponge within the nasal structure. The human has very few. These turbinules break up the incoming air and allow greater sampling.

The dog brain is 75% dedicated to all these incoming nerve inputs from their olfactory nerves. The human brain only needs a small portion about the size of your thumbnail.
The sensitivity of the canine nose is stunning. The dog can smell some odors at as much as one part per trillion (1 part per 1,000,000,000,000) Comparison with our own nose is difficult but an example can help. One of the substances released by human perspiration is butyric acid. If one gram of this chemical (a small drop in the bottom of a teaspoon) were to be spread throughout a ten story building, a person could smell it at the window only at the moment of release (I believe this is the chemical added to propane gas to allow detection) If this same amount were spread over the entire city of Philadelphia, a dog could smell it anywhere, even up to an altitude of 300 feet.
The canine nose is also not subject to the phenomenon of adaptatiion or nose fatigue. Like entering a locker room or florists shop, you may find the fragrances at first overwhelming. but in time, you get used to it. The fact that a dog can track for great lengths of time demonstrates that a dog is still cappable of detecting the same scent without undergoing this process.I played with some scent articles about 8-9 years ago. I had the standard utility articles in shapes squares, triangles (3 bar) and square (2 bars). I first marked a card and scented an article. after an hour, Danny correctly identified the LAST scented article. I then stretched the interval to a day, then two days, then a week. Finally I marked the cards and left two articles out in the barn on a bale of hay hoping for the chlorophyll to absorb the scent.

I wanted to see how this would affect the scent. Unfortunately, we had a blizzard, and I forgot about the project. I marked the card in January and set ALL the articles (of that set , as I have many) on that bale of hay Come April, I found that set of articles still on the hay. I picked them up with tongs, and presented them to Danny to see if there was a remote chance that he could still correctly identify my LAST scented articles. I was stunned, as he worked over them, and picked BOTH articles out of the pile that I had marked in January.

I then had reverence and respect for the canine nose beyond my wildest dreams.
Danny has accurately tracked where a person walked 12 days AFTER they did so.
Do you mean, there was this added scent and the dog didn't realize it was the same person? I thought ... better than that. She would still smell like herself with the addition of the hairdresser and/or dye scent. Wouldn't she?

She might realize it's the same person, but be olfactorily offended by the new scent. My Bizarre Borzoi is an exceptionally olfactory dog, and notices when someone changes shampoos. This dog is a Beagle, a scenthound. I can't imagine how overwhelming hairdresser-type smells must be to a dog.
Mustang Sally
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