Proper training of your dog should begin when he is a puppy. The first four months of a dog's life are very important in the training of your dog. This is when they learn behaviors that they will practice in the future.
Socializing your dog is one of the most important things you can do to influence your dog's future behavior. As soon as you bring your new puppy home, you should start letting him interact with other puppies, dogs and humans. Take your dog to parks where there will be other pets and people. Ask your friends if it is okay for your dog to visit their dog at their home or yours. Puppies will learn how to get along with other puppies and dogs if they are allowed to play with them when they are young. Introduce your dog to new experiences. Give him rides in the car, walk him on a leash around the park, let him hear the vacuum cleaner running. Help your puppy get used to a regular routine of baths, brushing , and healthy meals.
Housebreaking your puppy takes a lot of patience. Fix up a nice little space or room for your puppy. Place his food and water bowl there along with some favorite toys. Be sure to put newspapers all over the floor and replace them often. When you are at home with the puppy, let him out of his room for a short period of time to roam around and play. Return your puppy to his room and the newspapers after about 30-45 minutes to help with his housebreaking. Do not punish your puppy for having an accident. It could take up to six months before he is fully housebroken. Remember, most puppies can't control their bladder overnight until they are about four months old.

Your puppy will undoubtedly want to chew on things he shouldn't. Train him to leave your things alone by keeping them out of reach and by providing him with a variety of doggy chew toys. If he chews on your favorite slipper, don't punish him. Simply replace the slipper with one of his own chew toys. Praise him for playing with his own toys.
Sometimes, you will have to leave your dog home alone. Help him to feel comfortable alone by leaving on the television or radio for company. Leave an adequate amount of food and water. Don't forget to leave lots of doggy toys for him to play with.
You may be having trouble training your dog. Maybe he's not responding to your commands or seems to be ignoring you. Or maybe the housebreaking is backfiring and your dog is having accidents all over the house. These may be signs of a medical condition. Be sure to visit the vet regularly to rule out things like loss of hearing or bladder infections. Always be sure your dog is healthy, happy and well cared for.
If you feel this job is too big for you or you just want some additional instruction or behavioral training for your dog,, there are many reputable professional dog trainers and obedience schools. Do some research and ask questions to find the right school for your dog.

Most importantly, you must be a responsible owner in order to train them properly. If you want your dog to trust and respect you, you must do the same in return. Never hit, kick, or slap your dog. Include your dog in family outings and games and general family life. Do not play aggressive games with them as this can cause them to behave aggressively. Reward good behavior and yet do not spoil your dog. Remember, if you practice lots of patience, love and respect for your dog, you will receive the same from him.
Published by: Wendy Yeager
http://www.wenmarcorp.com/dogs-go2
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Really bad advice until a puppy is fully vaccinated.
Housebreaking your puppy takes a lot of patience. Fix up a nice little space or room for your puppy. Place his food and water bowl there along with some favorite toys. Be sure to put newspapers all over the floor and replace them often.

What a poor method of housebreaking! What year did you write this stuff?

When you are at home with the
puppy, let him out of his room for a short period of time to roam around and play. Return your puppy to his room and the newspapers after about 30-45 minutes to help with his housebreaking.

How about letting a puppy live with you, taking him OUTSIDE frequently and on schedule, and crating for safety overnight and if left alone.
Sometimes, you will have to leave your dog home alone. Help him to feel comfortable alone by leaving on the television or radio for company. Leave an adequate amount of food and water.

So he can urinate and defecate in the house because he's consumed food and can't get out? Really bad idea.
You may be having trouble training your dog.

Someone would if they listened to this advice! Things have progressed dramatically since your advice was common. Setting a dog up for SUCCESS is much more productive.
Janet Boss
http://bestfriendsdogobedience.com /
What a poor method of housebreaking!

That's why it takes a lot of patience.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

While George Bush has been President, North Korea
has quadrupled its nuclear stockpile
Housebreaking your puppy takes a lot of patience. Fix up a nice little space or room for your puppy. Place his food and water bowl there along with some favorite toys. Be sure to put newspapers all over the floor and replace them often.

This is not a good way to housebreak. You don't want to teach your pup to go on paper, you want to teach him to go outside. Also, if you place his food and water bowl in his bathroom area, you're working against his natural inclincation to want to eliminate outside his den. This is very counter-productive.
Better way:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/potty-training.html - I haven't yet removed the option of using a puppy pad in the crate overnight, but it will be removed.
When you are at home with the puppy, let him out of his room for a short period of time to roam around and play.

Closely supervised. You must be able to prevent and interrupt accidents. If you prevent habits, you don't have to break them later.
Return your puppy to his room and the newspapers after about 30-45 minutes to help with his housebreaking.

This is one of the reasons I prefer crates to puppy rooms. If you return him to "his room," you're isolating him. That's punishment to a young pup, and scary. If he's in a crate, the crate can be located where the family will be active.
And 30-45 minutes may be good timing if he's not very active, or sleeping. If he's playing, and especially if he's very young, you're looking at 10-15 minutes tops.
Instead of "putting him in his room" (i.e., teaching him to eliminate in his den), you should be taking him outside. When he's not being closely supervised, he can be crated.
It could take up to six months before he is fully housebroken.

Or longer. But if it's done correctly, without the extra added step of teaching him to go one place (in his den) just to turn around and teach him he can no longer go in that place (outside), it normally is much quicker. My last puppy was housebroken in 3 days.
Remember, most puppies can't control their bladder overnight until they are about four months old.

Or older.
Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html
Proper training of your dog should begin when he is a puppy. The first four months of a dog's life are very important in the training of your dog. This is when they learn behaviors that they will practice in the future.

So what happens if you start with an older dog?
Socializing your dog is one of the most important things you can do to influence your dog's future behavior. As ... interact with other puppies, dogs and humans. Take your dog to parks where there will be other pets and people.

That will really depend upon the park. Dog parks in particular are not good places for the very young puppy, and especially so if there are no vaccination requirements for those using the park. Socialization is extremely important, but a lot of care needs to go into choosing where and how to socialize. Taking a puppy into a situation where you cannot control how another dog, or a person, approaches your puppy can create rather than resolve problems. For socialization I recommend more controlled environments. That might include lightly used parks, open space areas, friends homes, some clean shopping centers, ordinary public streets if the dogs in the neighborhood are typically vaccinated.
Ask your friends if it is okay for your dog to visit their dog at their home or yours. Puppies ... the vacuum cleaner running. Help your puppy get used to a regular routine of baths, brushing , and healthy meals.

Certainly.
Housebreaking your puppy takes a lot of patience. Fix up a nice little space or room for your puppy. Place his food and water bowl there along with some favorite toys. Be sure to put newspapers all over the floor and replace them often.

Why would you want to teach the puppy it is OK to relieve itself indoors? It is a very slow and frustrating way to housetrain, and often a failure because puppy has a hard time learning later not to relieve itself indoors. It is much more productive to put in the time and effort to teach the puppy to go outdoors, and to never leave puppy for so long that it cannot do that.
When you are at home with the puppy, let him out of his room for a short period of time to roam around and play. Return your puppy to his room and the newspapers after about 30-45 minutes to help with his housebreaking.

Why not instead take the puppy OUTDOORS and teach puppy to relieve itself there.
Do not punish your puppy for having an accident. It could take up to six months before he is fully housebroken.

Six months with your method, I can understand.
Remember, most puppies can't control their bladder overnight until they are about four months old.

That hasn't been my experience. My experience has been mixed. I have had several puppies who could easily control their bladder overnight as young as eight weeks. I've had exactly one dog who needed to go out during the night. And I took him.
Your puppy will undoubtedly want to chew on things he shouldn't. Train him to leave your things alone by keeping them out of reach and

I agree with keeping things out of reach, but that doesn't "teach" the puppy to leave your things alone. It does, however, avoid the puppy getting in the habit of just taking what interests him until you can actually teach him to leave your things alone.
by providing him with a variety of doggy chew toys. If he chews on your favorite slipper, don't punish him. ... an adequate amount of food and water. Don't forget to leave lots of doggy toys for him to play with.

There really is no need to leave food down. And a good crate will provide the same level of control and saftety as a parent would use with a crib or playpen. It keeps puppy safe and out of trouble.
You may be having trouble training your dog. Maybe he's not responding to your commands or seems to be ignoring ... things like loss of hearing or bladder infections. Always be sure your dog is healthy, happy and well cared for.

Hmm if you are inclined to offer lectures on dog care this probably isn't the most productive forum for that.
If you feel this job is too big for you or you just want some additional instruction or behavioral training ... professional dog trainers and obedience schools. Do some research and ask questions to find the right school for your dog.

The smartest thing any dog owner can do with regard to training is to take a class and learn how to teach their dog. If they don't want to do that perhaps the wisest thing is to reconsider dog ownership.
Most importantly, you must be a responsible owner in order to train them properly. If you want your dog to ... games with them as this can cause them to behave aggressively. Reward good behavior and yet do not spoil your

Define "aggressive game".
dog. Remember, if you practice lots of patience, love and respect for your dog, you will receive the same from him.

Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com /
http://dogplay.com/Shop /
Why the newspaper? What a waste of time and training. Just train the pup to go outside right from the start. Much easier and faster without the confusion of first pottying in the house and then not being allowed to potty in house. And instead of confining a puppy to a room all the time, take him out with you and supervise him, take him outside often so he doesn't have the opportunity to potty in the house.
Lauralyn
My agility dogs:
Cheyenne MXJ MX, AAD
Shylo MXJ MX, AAD
Lakota - the crazy BC!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?username=computype2
I disagree, don't leave food down all the time for the puppy. You'll come home to a mess on the floor and you should control how much your puppy eats.

Lauralyn
My agility dogs:
Cheyenne MXJ MX, AAD
Shylo MXJ MX, AAD
Lakota - the crazy BC!
http://www.picturetrail.com/gallery/view?username=computype2
Proper training of your dog should begin when he is a puppy.

I would be a lot more impressed if you said something other than this, 'cause a whole lotta folks have dogs they didn't get as puppies.

Any behavior tips for us folks that have non-trained, non-socialized, old beasts? Or should we just euthanize them and get it over with since they started off on the wrong step?
Proper training of your dog should begin when he is a puppy. I would be a lot more impressed if you said something other than this, 'cause a whole lotta folks have dogs they didn't get as puppies.

I understand where you're coming from; however, the statement is true. The younger your puppy is when you begin training and socializing him, the best start he's going to get.
Any behavior tips for us folks that have non-trained, non-socialized, old beasts? Or should we just euthanize them and get it over with since they started off on the wrong step?

Never too late to train a dog. Basic obedience classes are wonderful.

You may have some baggage and issues, and you may not. Even with baggage and issues, you can end up with the best dog you ever had.

Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html
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