I have an elder, rescued, Greyhound female and a 1 year old Rat Terrier. They are both good dogs, smart and have a variety of tricks they will do for treats. The problem is when they get out the front door into the yard. They ignore me when I call them back. They both want to explore the yard and neighboring yards. I do not hit them and when they do come back I praise them. The thing is that I want them to come when I call them.

I have not figured how to get them to come without hesitation. I fear they will get hit by a car. They normally will come back after a short time, maybe a minute or two but the whole time I am telling them to come and they are acting like they do not hear me. I think this is a dominate thing right? How do I get the two to come right away?
Phyloe
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The problem is when they get out the front door into the yard. They ignore me when I call them back. I think this is a dominate thing right?

No, not in the least. It's a training thing. You simply didn't train them to come on command.
How do I get the two to come right away?

First of all, there are rules. If you use the word "come," I'd change it at this point. They already know they can blow off a "come" command. You want a powerful command that they are never allowed to blow off.

Secondly, while you're training, be careful that you never call them with your come command and then do anything to them they consider unpleasant. For example, if your greyhound hates her bath, you don't call her with your formal command and then plop her into the tub.
What you want to do is condition them to think that your come command ALWAYS ends in something wonderful.
Start in the house. Have somebody hold the dog, and you go across the room. Get her attention with the most cheery voice you have, wave a treat in the air, and say COME (or whatever your word is). Tell your helper to let the dog go right after you say the word. If she still doesn't come, run up to her with the treat (or favorite toy, if she's not treat-motivated), wave it under her nose, and run backwards. Make it exciting. Whee! Come! When she gets to you, give her treats, love, praise, make it as much fun as you can.

Practice this until the dog is eagerly coming to you every time you call. Then move to another room, where she can't see you.
Finally, move it outside - but on a long leash. That way if the dog doesn't come, you can gently reel her in (i.e., the COME command is not negotiable). Once you move it outside where there are more distractions, start from close up like you did in the house (6' away or so). Slowly add distance.

When the dog is reliable, then you can start adding distractions to your practice. Start back in the house, at a close distance.

(Every time you add a level of difficulty, back up to make the rest of it easier.)
Here are the distractions you practice:
1. Leaving a distraction. Call her when she's involved in something, orsomebody is playing with her.
2. Distractions behind you. Call her to you, and have somebody jump out frombehind you with a treat or squeaky toy, trying to entice her to veer off.
3. Passing by distractions. Call her to you, and have somebody throw a ballin her path, or squeak a toy, or wave some treat, or run across her path.

Every time she passes up a distraction to come to you, immediately bring her the distraction she passed up so she doesn't feel like she's lost anything by obeying.
Once your dog is conditioned to come when you call, start to wean off treats or any other reinforcers you're using - except praise, always use praise. Wean off by making it unpredictable when she'll get the reinforcer, and when she won't.
My dogs get a cookie about once every 10 or 20 times they come inside when I call them, yet they run eagerly. But it took a while to get there. Be patient, and move at your dog's pace. If she ever starts to fail, back it up and make it easier so she can succeed.
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I have an elder, rescued, Greyhound female and a 1 year old Rat Terrier. They are both good dogs, smart ... hear me. I think this is a dominate thing right? How do I get the two to come right away?

Somebody else in the group will answer your training question.
I'm gonna yell at you for letting your dogs run loose. Please, either get a fence or take them out on leashes.

To do otherwise is irresponsible, even cruel.
flick 100785
I'm gonna yell at you for letting your dogs run loose. Please, either get a fence or take them out on leashes. To do otherwise is irresponsible, even cruel. flick 100785

Look I will be polite and simply say I do not let my dogs run loose. If you reread my thread you will see that they get out sometimes for whatever reason. I DID not say I let them out nor do I let them run loose! I visit news groups daily and a wide variety of ng also. I knew coming in here there was going to be a know-it-all or two responding. I will not even explain how they get out but I will say I do not allow them to run free and if you read that into my thread then that is your problem. I only want to know how I get my dogs to come when I call them. Since you cannot answer that question then butt out.
Phyloe
"flick" <> wrote in message

I'm gonna yell at you for letting your dogs run ... leashes. To do otherwise is irresponsible, even cruel. flick 100785

Look I will be polite and simply say I do not let my dogs run loose. If you reread my ... how I get my dogs to come when I call them. Since you cannot answer that question then butt out.

Yes, I may have misread what you posted.
In any event, if your dogs accidentally getting out the front door is a frequent problem, I still would suggest a fence around the front yard as a help to you.
One thing that helped keep my dogs from doing this is that they all learned the command "back" - which was applied at the front door, and meant "back up." It keeps them from crowding the door.
flick 100785
I have the same problem with my 10 month old dog. My commnands just do not seem to apply to him outside the house and I am desperate for him to learn he has to come back when I shout him when we're in the woods on a fun walk just as much as he does when I call him in the house.

I'm taking him to a new obedience class this weekend, hopefully this will teach me how to get him to come back in all circumstances. I just hope I've not left it too late at 10 months. I'll let you know what I learn. Sorry I've not been much help at the moment though.

Lynda
I will not even explain how they get out but I will say I do not allow them to run free and if you read that into my thread then that is your problem.

Sorry, but because of your comment as to being afraid of your dogs being hit by a car, I read your post similarly. Thank you for clarifying.
As to your question - your dogs aren't ignoring you because of a dominance issue. To generalise, sighthounds (your Grey) are easily led astray (Something shiny!) and terriers are very independent dogs. You have to make yourself more interesting than whatever has captured your dogs' attention. Your best bet would be hands-on training with a good obedience instructor in a class situation (distractions are good), concentrating on one dog at a time. I've had experience teaching agility to both Greyhounds and various terriers (no Rat Terriers, though) and suggest that you take your Rat to school first.
Good luck!

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
Thank You. I want to clarify that I do not let them out but sometimes people cut through my yard and leave the gate open or ajar. The Terrier will sneak out then I go out even though I am trying to hold him back. He is very persistent. I do not hit them either. I know about calling them and then hitting them when they do come back > what would be their incentive to come if they think I am going to hit them? I love my dogs and I know they want a leader for their small pack. I also know they are happier if there is a strong leader.
Phyloe
The problem is when they get out the front door into the yard. They ignore me when I call them back.

You have to make coming back to you the BEST THING IN THE WORLD. Work on this inside or in the back yard. Get yourself a pocket full of tiny treats, and ask them to come over and over throughout the day, first with short (and I mean tiny, 3 feet) distances, then longer and longer. Treat the heck out of them until they RUN to you when you call, then slowly phase that out to praise with the occasional treat or other reward. Princess Tegan Poodle-heart Monkey-face actually prefers to fetch rather than food, so use whatever works best.

Yesterday my 9 month standard poodle, who ALWAYS goes straight from the truck to our fenced yard, decided to chase the UPS truck down the street. One 'come' call and 15 feet later, Tegan stopped dead and ran back to me. Good girl, and all those mini-bites of hot dog just paid for themselves!

HTH,
Anti
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