11 week old Golden with a great energy to learn. She knows how to Sit, layDown, Drop, give Paw, Speak, Wait, lay on Side and roll over.

I am now looking to have her do more complicated tricks that require more than one task. (like pick up ball and drop in my hand). I have her chase the ball and come back to me which is already easy for her to do - now I would like her to drop it in my hand, but as soon as she know there are treats involved she retrieves the ball and drops it long before coming back to me(to get the treat). I realized that I needed to shorten the trick into smaller ones - pickup ball then drop in my hand. But that's 2 commands. Do I need to have her learn the separate commands (and name each of them) then combined them? What about tricks that require 3, 4 or 5 commands?
Thanks for any help.
Do I need to have her learn the separate commands (and name each of them) then combined them? What about tricks that require 3, 4 or 5 commands?

Yes, do it a piece at a time. Also, it's better if you train from back to front - i.e., teach her the last command first (drop it in your hand), then have her pick it up and bring it to you before dropping it in your hand.

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11 week old Golden with a great energy to learn. She knows how to Sit, lay Down, Drop, give Paw, ... separate commands (and name each of them) then combined them? What about tricks that require 3, 4 or 5 commands?

In general, as Leah suggested, if you want to chain several behaviors together, a useful approach is to teach the last behavior first. Then, when you teach the next-to-last, the "reward" is to do the familiar last behavior and get the treat. And so on. This is known as "backchaining."
For getting her to deliver the ball to hand, you might find the idea of a verbal bridge useful. This is when you "mark" something she does by saying, for example, "yes!" Then you give a treat. I'd be willing to bet you can quickly get this puppy working for a "yes!"

To start with, try noticing the median distance away she drops the ball (half of the time she drops it closer). If she brings it that close or closer,

say "yes!" and give her a treat. If she drops it farther away, say nothing and give no treat. Next session, if she's consistently dropping it closer, raise the standard only give her the "yes" and treat for the best 50% of responses.
When she is bringing it right up to you, put your hand out in such a way as to try to direct attention to it. Give her a "yes" for looking at your hand (with the ball in her mouth) then when she does that every time, for touching your hand then finally raise the standard to ball-in- your-hand.
Timing of the "yes" is important. Don't wait say it just as she drops the ball (or touches your hand, etc.).
This is the same principle used in clicker training, if you have learned anything about that. Your puppy sounds like a nice one. Have fun with her.
Amy Dahl
Try doing it in doors sitting on a chair.
Making sure you do not get off the chair.
Teach her the word fetch first.
I have taught all my GSDs to give to hand.
Not that hard but one command at a time.
Pat.
Wow, that is what I was missing. Thank you for the thorough reply. Saying "Yes" is exactly what I was missing. I was so confused on teaching her a command for the "parts" of the complete trick. "Yes" will work for everything.
My timing, and her attentiveness, is why she has learned as much as she has in 3 weeks. I will do the right timing.
This dog is the best!!
Thanks again. Emotion: smile
PS
I am new to the group. Who is "The Puppy Wiener" - he/she sounds like a jerk.
Thanks for the reply. I will work the problem backwards. In math I think they call this RPN.
Thanks again.
I agree, I will start indoors first.
Thanks