I'm in search for the correct English term that describe a shorthaired cat that does not have a pedigree or belong to a recognized cat breed. I need it for a good friend who is translating a part of her site (about hand rearing kittens) from Dutch into English.

http://orphanedkittens.kruimelhuis.nl /
In my search on the internet I found the following words, but which one is the correct one?
Domestic cat
Stray cat
Moggie
House cat
breedless cat
Domestic shorthaired cat
Thank you in advance for your effort and your answers.

www.carpenoctum.nl
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I'm in search for the correct English term that describe a shorthaired cat that does not have a pedigree...

domestic shorthair
I'm in search for the correct English term that describe a shorthaired cat that does not have a pedigree or ... Stray cat Moggie House cat breedless cat Domestic shorthaired cat Thank you in advance for your effort and your answers.

That would depend on the target audience: for a general audience, I'd use "domestic shorthair", understanding that the term actually refers to a specific breed of shorthairs; for more cat aware people - those who are likely to know that "domestic shorthair" is a specific breed and are familiar with cat jargon and slang, I'd use "moggie" (short for "mongrel", which I would never use for a cat because of its association with dogs).

The most generic term is simply "cat" - in general usage, if the cat is something other than a random bred shorthair, a modifier woudld be used if needed: "Main Coon type" (or other breed "type" if the cat isn't the breed but resembles it), "longhair", or its breed name if it is a specific recognized breed. For example, I could say I have fifteen cats: four longhairs, of which one is a Main Coon Cat type, and eleven other cats. (None of mine is known to be any specific breed, most are actually barn cats, including two longhairs and a red tabby colorpoint, or something similar.) I think the best general usage might be to refer to breeds by name and everything else as "cat".

T.E.D. (Email Removed)
I'm in search for the correct English term that describe a shorthaired cat that does not have a pedigree or ... Moggie House cat breedless cat Domestic shorthaired cat Thank you in advance for your effort and your answers. www.carpenoctum.nl

My vet uses DSH (for "domestic shorthaired) on his office forms. Most people I talk to use that term or "mixed breed." I rather like the English term "moggie." I don't know that there really is a "correct" term, but "stray cat" certainly would not be a good description unless the cat really is stray (not a person's beloved pet, for example).

MaryL
www.carpenoctum.nl My vet uses DSH (for "domestic shorthaired) on his office forms. =A0Most people I talk to use that term ... would not be a good description unless the cat real=ly is stray (not a person's beloved pet, for example). MaryL

Like Mary says, there isn't really a generic term for a non-pedigreed cat. An old term is "alley cat," but that often has negative connotations. I would just used mixed breed or domestic shorthair as well.
Rene
I'm in search for the correct English term that describe a shorthaired cat that does not have a pedigree or ... Stray cat Moggie House cat breedless cat Domestic shorthaired cat Thank you in advance for your effort and your answers.

In Great Britain it's "moggie". In the U.S. it's "domestic shorthaired cat".
Noon Cat Nick krabde zich op donderdag 3-7-2008 op het hoofd en schreef:
I'm in search for the correct English term that describe ... Thank you in advance for your effort and your answers.

In Great Britain it's "moggie". In the U.S. it's "domestic shorthaired cat".

Thanks all for the answers ;-)

www.carpenoctum.nl
Nick expressed precisely :
I'm in search for the correct English term that describe a shorthaired cat that does not have a pedigree or ... Stray cat Moggie House cat breedless cat Domestic shorthaired cat Thank you in advance for your effort and your answers.

British Shorthair.

Count Baldoni
DSH is what the vet and other organizations use.
Domestic Short Hair.
Coloration can be added as well, as in "tabby".
I've seen moggie on the internet, but never heard it from the Humane Society or a vet.
I'll have to check its origin.
Mine is now over 16 years old.
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