Do any of you have experience with raising two pups (litter brothers) at once? I'm considering buying two sighthound pups and would like some advice, but nobody I know have any experience in that area.

Here's the situation: I'm an adult, single woman living in a semi-large city. There are numerous parks and trails around, plus plenty of large forest areas. There are lots of dogs in my neighborhood, so there will be plenty opportunity for socialization. I live in a spacious one-bedroom apartment, and I study part-time at the university. I'm usually not away for more than 3-4 hours at the time, and I have lots of friends in the neighborhood who can watch the pups while I'm gone.

I've been told over and over again that two same-sex pups at once is bound to cause:
1: Waaay too much work
2: Hierarchy fights from adolescence on
3: Separation anxiety when the dogs are separated, no matter how much I train them separately
...and the list goes on.
They all tell me I should get one pup now and another in 1-4 years (i.e. some say 1-2 years, others say 3-4).
I myself don't see how two brothers will automatically fight for dominance, if I raise/train them with that possibility in mind. And I could get the same problem if I got a mild tempered pup first and then a more dominant pup later.
And as for the "waaay too much work" part, I can't think it will be much harder than having one dog and one small child (which many of the nay-sayers think is just fine...). I'd rather have two pups at once than go through the puppy stage twice.
And separation anxiety is a risk even if I get one pup first and the other later. Besides, I'd desensitize them to being separated by placing one pup with friends for a weekend while I keep the other one at home, and then vice verca.
But maybe I'm being too optimistic? Are there things I haven't thought about? Of course, they'll be romping and playing a lot, causing havoc and general mayhem. But I'm not a desperately neat and tidy person, so I won't panic at the sight of two pups ripping into the carpet or shredding my underwear. And if it gets too wild, I'll crate them until they calm down a bit. And as for training, I realize I'll have to walk/train them separately to get their basic obedience skills in place.
Funny thing is, nobody has ever said anything about potential positive sides of having two pups at once. I can think of several, with "company and playmate" being number 1.
So, does anyone have any experience to share?
Cheers,
Rox
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Do any of you have experience with raising two pups (litter brothers) at once? I'm considering buying two sighthound pups and would like some advice, but nobody I know have any experience in that area.

Yes. I wouldbn't want to repeat the experience.
Here's the situation: I'm an adult, single woman living in a semi-large city. There are numerous parks and trails around, ... Separation anxiety when the dogs are separated, no matter how much I train them separately ...and the list goes on.

Those are the risks. You might be successful and vaoid them. But then you might not. FRom my perspective one of the things is that because of the nature of the relationship at least one of those puppies will never really get a chance to fully blossom and develop. That is becausse it will always be inrelationship to the other.
They all tell me I should get one pup now and another in 1-4 years (i.e. some say 1-2 years, others say 3-4).

Yes.
I myself don't see how two brothers will automatically fight for dominance,

They don't "automatically" fight. Some live in harmony, some in close bonding, some in small skimishes and some in all out battles to the death.
if I raise/train them with that possibility in mind. And I could get the same problem if I got a mild tempered pup first and then a more dominant pup later.

Well dogs are dogs. They have instinctive patterns of behavior. They also aren't human so they don't have the same responses to situations. In the scenario you describe the most likely outcome is the first pup gives way to the second without much of a battle because they are hardwired to respect a leader. The problem might come if they are less distinct. The more alike the dogs in size, age, sex, .. the bigger the risks of issues.
And as for the "waaay too much work" part, I can't think it will be much harder than having one ... the nay-sayers think is just fine...). I'd rather have two pups at once than go through the puppy stage twice.

Why go through the puppy stage even once? There are lots of wonderful dogs out there that will bond with you every bit as much as a puppy. But to answer the question is because it is a lot harder to get the right behavior if you have one doing the wrong thing while you are focussing on preventing the other from doing the wrong thing. Key to having the easiest and least confrontational puppy raising is to be able to anticipate and prevent unwanted behavior. You make that extremely difficult with one than one to teach at a time.
And separation anxiety is a risk even if I get one pup first and the other later.

A risk, yes, less of a risk.
Besides, I'd desensitize them to being separated by placing one pup with friends for a weekend while I keep the other one at home, and then vice verca.

OK
But maybe I'm being too optimistic? Are there things I haven't thought about?

Do you work at home? HOw many hours a day will they each be spending with you without the other present, relative to spending time with each other?
Of course, they'll be romping and playing a lot, causing havoc and general mayhem. But I'm not a desperately neat ... And as for training, I realize I'll have to walk/train them separately to get their basic obedience skills in place.

My guess is that you will do it regardless of the advice received because you have decided that is what you want to do. You understand the down sides. Now you are looking for people who will tell you that all thaose risks are just hog wash and that you can succeeed in your plans. You will get those people because that's the way it is.
Funny thing is, nobody has ever said anything about potential positive sides of having two pups at once. I can think of several, with "company and playmate" being number 1.

Well since your response to the risks has been that you get those risks at anytime you get a second might I point out the same applies. You get that companiopnship "company and playmate" benefit anytime you get a second dog.
So, does anyone have any experience to share?

You really don't want the experiences that support the suggestion that it is a bad idea. You really want people to report to your their successes to the contrary. There are such because none of this is 100%. Alll people are telling you is the risks* involved in starting with littermates. If you choose to embrace those risks you are free to do so. Just recognize that *some of those risks, if they actually occur, can impair the dog for life. It might not happen. All might be well. But if it does happen it is the dog that pays the price. Damn the torpedos, full speed ahead!

Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com /
http://dogplay.com/Shop /
Funny thing is, nobody has ever said anything about potential ... think of several, with "company and playmate" being number 1.

Well since your response to the risks has been that you get those risks at anytime you get a second might I point out the same applies. You get that companiopnship "company and playmate" benefit anytime you get a second dog.

It seems to me that the OP can get this same benefit without the risks of two puppy littermates by adopting two adult dogs or one puppy and one adult with some training, some difference in age, size, etc. and without the bonding that comes with being littermates that can interfere with bonding with the human. There are often dogs who have been together who end up in rescue and want to be adopted together, but there aren't as many homes for two dogs as there are for one. Recently, there were a couple of dogs at a pet store adoption day whose owner had to give them up when he was put in a nursing home. They were desperately trying to find a home that would take both of them because they were miserable without each other.
The idea that two puppies would not be that much more work than one is completely wrong, IME. That is like saying twin babies aren't that much more work than single births. It's true that they aren't twice as hard to deal with, but it is because they are three or four times harder, not that they are less than twice as hard. Puppies take a ton of time and energy to raise right. Getting up for potty breaks, training, managing chewing phases and housetraining (with or without accidents)...

And with wanting sighthounds, you have the added problem of having to make absolutely sure you have them both under control as you potty and exercise because they can run off after something and not come back if you aren't. You can always add a second dog if things are going well, but dumping a second dog because you thought it was going to be fine but doesn't go well isn't so easy, at least not if you have any compassion or care for the dog. My advice would be to add a little salt at a time to the stew instead of dumping it all in because in theory it should work out.

Paula
"Anyway, other people are weird, but sometimes they have candy, so it's best to try to get along with them." Joe Bay
The idea that two puppies would not be that much more work than one is completely wrong, IME.

If nothing else, 2 dogs poop 3 times as much as 1 dog. It's the weirdest thing.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Repealing the estate tax will cost a family earning about $70,000/year an additional $500/year or so in additional income taxes
Do any of you have experience with raising two pups (litter brothers) at once? I'm considering buying two sighthound pups and would like some advice, but nobody I know have any experience in that area.

(snip)
So, does anyone have any experience to share?

We did it with our two Chihuahuas - male and female littermates, and it wasn't terribly difficult. I think it was successful, they have a close relationship, no fighting, each one dominates in some situations, and there is little or no separation anxiety AFAICT. They're nearly 14 now. (They are really easygoing, so maybe we just lucked out.)
That said, I would not attempt it with two males (or two females), and I REALLY would not attempt it with large dogs. We also have a GSD (11) and a Lab (9)and each was a handful as a pup. Boy, talk about active! Dylan (GSD-f) ran us ragged, and Oppie (Lab-m) ran her ragged and kept us going as well! And while Oppie is pretty laid back (at least, once he got his brains delivered - well, most of them have been delivered, he's still pretty goofy at times), Dylan is a confident, strong alpha-type who was a real challenge to train, especially through her rebellious adolescent phase. Once she got past adolescence, she morphed into a lovely, wonderful dog whom I adore, but I don't know if I could have handled two "teenagers" like her at once!
Sometimes you do it because you just have to. A good friend rescued three puppies (found abandoned in a box on a very cold January morning), and though she loved the dogs dearly, she says never never never never again would she raise more than one puppy at a time. Training them was the hardest part, and there were some serious pack dynamics to contend with throughout their adulthood (they were all females, mutts, 40-50 lbs.). She said she didn't know what she would have done without her older, larger female dog, who helped keep the younger three in line. (She lives in the country on a large fenced property and works part-time out of her house, i.e., home most of the time and lots of time and room and exercise opportunity for the dogs.)
So if you want my advice, hold off on getting a second dog until a first one is trained. Find a puppy kindergarten for early training and set up play time or play groups with other puppy owners. If you're home most of the time, your puppy will have plenty of companionship - you.
Or adopt older dogs. There are plenty out there looking for a good home.
HTH -
FurPaw

"Here we go round the prickly pear
At five o'clock in the morning."
- T. S. Eliot
To reply, unleash the dog
That said, I would not attempt it with two males (or two females), and I REALLY would not attempt it with large dogs.

I absolute agree with this. I have multiple dogs.

You can run into problems with 2 dogs the same sex, even if spayed/neutered. And I can say from experience that it is difficult for one person alone to separate 2 big dogs that are fighting. Easiest way is for 2 people, each grabs a tail and pulls. One person, get a leash, tie one dog, then get the other dog off the tied dog. Too much time, possibility for serious injury, etc.
Small dogs, grab one with each hand. Easy, by comparison.

Not to say that all same-sex dogs will fight. Not at all. But I'm just sayin'.

IMO if the OP particularly wants to have two dogs, check the humane orgs and rescues. I frequently see dogs posted that MUST go in a pair to the same home, as they're inseparable pals. That way you get your 2 dogs that are compatible (hopefully).

flick 100785
Do any of you have experience with raising two pups (litter brothers) at once?Yes.

I'm considering buying two sighthound pups and would like some
advice, but nobody I know have any experience in that area.

With good reason. They not only aren't willing to repeat the experience,they don't want to see others go through it either.
I've been told over and over again that two same-sex pups at once is bound to cause: 1: Waaay too ... Separation anxiety when the dogs are separated, no matter how much I train them separatelyYes. ...and the list goes on.

Let me add one more to it.
They're both going to age at the same rate. Odds are high you'll find yourself in my current situation which is knowing that you're going to lose both dogs at very close to the same age. So add double heartbreak to that list. Oh,it's not cheap to have two ailing geriatric dogs at the same time either.
They all tell me I should get one pup now and another in 1-4 years (i.e. some say 1-2 years, ... 1.Company and playmate doesn't require two puppies of the same age. So, does anyone have any experience to share?See above.

Terri

Hanging is too good for a man who makes puns;
he should be drawn and quoted.
- Fred Allen
Do any of you have experience with raising two pups (litter brothers) at once? I'm considering buying two sighthound pups ... think of several, with "company and playmate" being number 1. So, does anyone have any experience to share? Cheers, Rox

Hi Rox,
I have sighthounds (Rhodesian ridgebacks, which are also scenthounds) and belong to a breed specific email list with over 1000 RR owners/breeders. Someone asked your questions recently and the overwhelming majority said they would never do it again. It seems no matter what you do, they bond to each other (naturally) over you which causes many problems later. I don't remember specifics, but cannot remember anyone saying they would do it again or recommend it.
I got my second puppy when the first one was 3. The younger still bonded so strongly to the older one it is hard to take #1 anywhere without taking #2 also (she howls). #1 can handle #2 being gone to dog shows but becomes somewhat clingy during these periods. If anything happens to me, I have already made arrangements for them to stay together (along with money to support them).
René
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