1 2 3
From your post my guess is your cat developed adhesions. Surgery is usually necessary to correct this and to keep ... other, therefore without forming new adherences. The gas would slowly be absorbed by the tissues and eliminated by the lungs.

Sorry to interrupt, but I've never heard of this. Is is a new procedure? Is it used on humans? I have a personal reason to wonder...
~Shelly~
Don´t be sorry to interrupt, we are here to exchange info! Emotion: smile I have seen that used here both in humans and pets. My cousin had some ovary cysts removed about two years ago and the doctor filled her belly up with some gas (can´t remember which) right after stiching her and told her it was to avoid adhesions. Her abdomen was really distended, she looked like she was 5 months pregnant and it took some weeks for her abdoment to go back to normal. I have seen it done on a dog too, about three months ago, also to avoid adhesions.

The dog had undergone surgery exactly to cut the previous adhesions. In both cases, it was "routine procedure." Yesterday I read about new products to avoid adhesions (barriers made of a cloth that the body eventually absorbs) and if I´m not mistaken, a Swiss company is about to launch a gel for the same purpose. In pets, due to the cost of these barriers, using gas is more viable. The links I posted earlier discuss about these new products.
Shelly, I did some Google search to see if I could find out the terms used for this procedure there and found two related terms: insufflation and pneumoperitoneum. I also found this:

Effects of carbon dioxide-saturated normal saline and Ringer's lactate on postsurgical adhesion formation in the rabbit.
Sahakian V, Rogers RG, Halme J, Hulka J.
Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effect of combining carbon dioxide gas (CO2) with normal saline versus CO2 with lactated Ringer's solution on adhesion formation in the rabbit model. METHODS: Sixty New Zealand white rabbits underwent surgery based on a proven experimental adhesion model. Following abdominal closure, the animals were randomly assigned to three groups: Group 1 underwent abdominal CO2 insufflation only; group 2 underwent abdominal irrigation with CO2-saturated normal saline; group 3 underwent abdominal irrigation with CO2-saturated lactated Ringer's solution.

Three weeks later, the rabbits were sacrificed and the adhesions were scored in a blinded fashion based on the extent, type, and tenacity, with a maximum possible score of 11. RESULTS: The mean (+/- standard deviation) adhesion scores were 7.75 +/- 2.82 in group 1, 7.85 +/- 2.58 in group 2, and 4.75 +/- 2.95 in group 3. There was no difference in severity of adhesions between groups 1 and 2. However, the mean adhesion score was significantly lower in group 3 (lactated Ringer's with CO2) than in either group 1 (CO2) or group 2 (normal saline with CO2) (P = .004 and P = .002, respectively).

CONCLUSION: It appears that when CO2 is the insufflating gas, lactated Ringer's solution has a protective effect against adhesion formation in the rabbit model.

It seems this technique is (or was) somewhat routine there too.
Yesterday I read about new products to avoid adhesions (barriers made of a cloth that the body eventually absorbs) and ... the cost of these barriers, using gas is more viable. The links I posted earlier discuss about these new products.

Shelly, I did some Google search to see if I could find out the terms used for this procedure there and found two related terms: insufflation and pneumoperitoneum. I also found this:...

Thanks for your very informative answers! I'm definately going to read up on this some more. I'm sure you've helped more people than just me.
~Shelly~
Thanks for your very informative answers! I'm definately going to read up on this some more. I'm sure you've helped more people than just me. ~Shelly~

You´re very welcome! I was impressed to see how common adhesions are. Emotion: sad
circa Fri, 24 Oct 2003 11:04:41 -0500, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Barb 1 (Email Removed) said,
To add to m L Briggs, my own cat was down to 5 pounds and put on thyroid medication. She ... swollen? Maybe you need to have another vet x-ray him on the chance that your vet's machine isn't working well.

Actually, both of those things- weight loss and unclear abdominal x- ray, were the first indications of Alex's lymphoma. I wouldn't necessarily dismiss it as a bad x-ray machine.
BTW, Alex was euthanized on August 17th after two years battling his lymphoma. He was happy and active through most of the chemo and for the four months after the chemo ended, and his deterioration was mercifully short. I know that some of you have followed the Alex saga over the past couple of years, and thought I'd post the final update.

Thanks to all who provided advice, information and support. The last pictures I took of Alex are here:
http://www.dotphoto.com/go.asp?l=geekwench&AID=1006040

Laura

A proverb is a short sentence based on long experience. -Miguel de Cervantes
One of the side effects of prozac in cats is stomach upset. But you would think that if there was a problem it would show up when you started giving the prozac to your cat, not a few months later.
Sue
>
I'm very sorry, Laura. I followed Alex's story all the time you posted here and know that you did everything possible for him. I know he knew he was loved and had a great life...but they're never here long enough.

Candace
(take the litter out before replying by e-mail)
See my cats:

"One does not meet oneself until one catches the reflection from an eye other than human." (Loren Eisely)
Show more