Hello again, one and all.
Remember a week or two back when I asked if it was unhealthy for our budgie to be totally obsessed with the bathroom mirror? You all agreed that there was nothing particularly dangerous about such behavior.

Now, I don't blame you guys for what happened, but... a few days ago a neighbor came over to visit, and as I walked down the stairs to greet her, Yummi hopped onto my shoulder and came along. I walked into the kitchen to fix a drink, not noticing that our guest was heading for the restroom.
Well, the bathroom door opened, the light switched on, Mr. bird spotted his chance to bolt for the mirror - and our guest shut the door on him as he was about half-way through.
Okay, the door didn't QUITE get shut - I let out a panicked yell at the last instant, and at first it looked as though all was copacetic; Yummi shot back out of the doorway and lit on the refigerator (his usual favorite kitchen perch) looking normal. My girlfriend was screaming bloody murder so I coaxed Y onto my shoulder and got him back upstairs, where he flew over to his cage. Knowing how my g/f feels about that bird, our guest split like a bat out of hell.
Moments later, our worst fears started becoming reality. I looked over and saw Y hanging woozily on the edge of the cage top, weakly trying to hang on but slowly sliding down the side. I ran over and took him in my hands - this is a bird who was hand-fed and hand-raised, but still will not normally have ANYTHING to do with hands, but at that moment he simply sat silently cupped in mine, not moving at all. I called down to my g/f "Um, I think you need to come up here!" Yummi sat still for several minutes, then abruptly panicked and shot out of my grip. Immediately he was all over the place, banging into walls, dropping to the floor, falailing about confusedly definitely in great distress.

Naturally, this all was occurring smack-dab in the middle of the decade's worst cold snap here, late in the evening when no bird specialists were available and the ride to the emergency animal hospital was practically a death-trip. We didn't have any choice, though - that bird is all my g/f lives for. We bundled up, managed to get Yummi into the portacage, wrapped it with towels, and headed for the animal ER.
Bedside manner was in short supply. The attendant who made the initial check-up let the bird escape from the cage and he again slammed into walls and doors before quickly tiring and falling exhausted to the ground. My g/f was horrified, especially as he didn't come to her or even seem to know she was there. He was brain-damaged, of that she was now certain. We were warned also that Yummi might have suffered internal injuries and might not survive the night all that could be done was to put him into an oxygen-rich environment to ease his rapid breathing and stress.
Through the night and into the morning, the word was contradictory and usually not encouraging. We returned at 7am (that's when the hospital closes) and my g/f spoke softly to Yummi, telling him he'd be okay. He responded with the first sound he'd made since the accident - a single chirp. Since the roads were still unsafe, we were told, the bird specialist down the road wouldn't be in until noon, so we were told to return then, and that Yummi could stay in the oxygen tank for awhile longer.
Midday saw him looking a bit better, but we knew that birds were experts at hiding their injuries. To prevent a repeat of his earlier tragic escape act, we were given the tank to carry him in, and proceeded to the bird clinic. Eventually, the bird specialist brought the tank back out from his office, pointed at Y's beak and asked if he'd had any problems there before. "No," we replied, and the Doc called our attention to what appeared to be a small crease or crack in the center of his cere. "If' that's new," he declared, "I think what we've got here is a concussion."
He gave us a tiny bottle of what was essentially budgie aspirin, showed us how to hold Yummi and force his beak open to accept the bitter liquid via syringe (like THAT was gonna work once this bird had ANY of his strength back!) and told us to give him one drop per day for three days. We took Y back to the condo and returned him to his cage, where he appeared clearly relieved to be home. Still, he remained puffed-up quite a bit and his breathing remained somewhat fast (both bad signs, we had been told). We knew he wasn't out of the woods yet.

A day passed, and soon it was time for Y's medicine. Not even DARING to try the hold-and-squeeze method of delivering his dose of the icky goo, I instead shot a drop into a kernel of sweet corn (pure "birdnip" in his case). If Yummi noticed the foul beverage polluting his precious golden treat, he showed no evidence of it diminishing his enjoyment as he hollowed that kernel out like nobody's business! The day passed, then the night, with no incidents or apparent setbacks.

Early the next morning Y was up to most of his usual tricks, like playing stylist to our eyelashes and brows as we lay in bed, and stalking any poor human hand that was foolish enough to venture out from under the covers. The only worry now was his relative silence. He would chirp from time to time and make other birdly noises, but he largely refrained from making conversation, leading my g/f to believe that the same head trauma that kept him from recognizing her earlier was now showing its long-term effects in the apparent loss of his considerable language skills.
Come afternoon, however, as she toiled at the computer downstairs, Yummi started "pontificating" loudly and with great vigor. With pleasure, I yelled down to her that he seemed to have completely become his old, loud-mouthed self at last!
And he hasn't shut up since.
- Dr Strangemonde
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..snip
Come afternoon, however, as she toiled at the computer downstairs, Yummi started "pontificating" loudly and with great vigor. With pleasure, I yelled down to her that he seemed to have completely become his old, loud-mouthed self at last! And he hasn't shut up since.

Thanks for posting this. Whilst reading, I kept fearing the worst, and was relieved to read about his recovery at the end; what suspense.
Dave
www.davebbq.com
..snip

Come afternoon, however, as she toiled at the computer downstairs, ... loud-mouthed self at last! And he hasn't shut up since.

Thanks for posting this. Whilst reading, I kept fearing the worst, and was relieved to read about his recovery at the end; what suspense. Dave www.davebbq.com[/nq]I'm glad to hear he pulled through too. This is why our Tiel has a mirror. He was not very tame when we got him. I finally decided to just let him choose his own way. Then he one day discovered the full length mirrors on our closets in the bedroom. He was always going in there to stand in front of one. Got real aggressive about being moved. I got scared he was going to get hurt on the floor all the time so I finally put a hand held mirror in his cage.

He is on his second one now. He managed to get the glass out of the first one after years of working the frame. . He gets real mad when we clean it. It does keep him at his cage and off the floor though unless he wants some attention from me.

Beer is proof that God loves us and wants us to be happy. Benjamin Franklin
Pretty scary situation. I'm happy to hear Yummi pulled through because slamming into walls, windows, and mirrors can be deadly for such little guys as budgies. I just read today on one of my parrotlet lists that someone's baby parrotlet flew into a wall and died. They're such fragile little creatures and, even though accidents aren't always fatal, they can leave the bird permanently disabled physically or mentally. Do you have a mirror in your budgie's cage now? If not, I'd advise hanging a mirror as I don't see any harm in giving your bird a mirror of his own. All my budgies, both males and females, have several mirrors in their cages and this hasn't caused any sort of problem whatsoever. In fact, I'd recommend a mirror for a solitary budgie.
LindaA
~~
Pretty scary situation. I'm happy to hear Yummi pulled through because slamming into walls, windows, and mirrors can be deadly ... this hasn't caused any sort of problem whatsoever. In fact, I'd recommend a mirror for a solitary budgie. LindaA

I'm also glad to hear Yummi is ok. He sounds like a tough little creature!
All my budgies have mirrors too. They love the round or square ones with a bell hanging from the bottom. They also have a small round hand-held that fascinates them. I haven't found the mirrors to make them any less sociable or obsessive. Well, one of them is kind of obsessed, but he's a nervous jervis anyway, and his mirror is his "security blanket".
Always good to hear a happy ending!
Becky
Well, the bathroom door opened, the light switched on, Mr. bird spotted his chance to bolt for the mirror - and our guest shut the door on him as he was about half-way through.

Everyone thinks it's real cute to have their birds flying around the house. I've lost 2 birds that way.
Clip it's wings.
Do you have a mirror in your budgie's cage now? If not, I'd advise hanging a mirror as I don't see any harm in giving your bird a mirror of his own.

Actually, we uncovered the two large mirrors in the "bird room" awhile back - but for some reason he's still obsessed with the "forbidden" ones in the bathrooms. We keep all our doors closed now except under controlled circumstances.
- Dr S
Everyone thinks it's real cute to have their birds flying around the house. I've lost 2 birds that way. Clip its wings.

We find nothing "cute" about it - my g/f feels that since birds were born with wings they should be able to use them - and she's in charge of the bird, so that's that. We no longer allow Yummi to leave his room when visitors are in the house, however.
By the way, may I ask what you mean when you say you "lost" two birds did you lose them via escape or death? Regarding the former, Yummi has never shown any particular desire to get out of the condo, but of course we don't plan to tempt fate in that department!

(That's one great thing about the rats I've usually had as pets: you could leave your doors open day and night and they'd never dream of leaving the safety of home. They'd be easy meat due to irresponsible neighborhood cat "owners" though...)
On 25 Jan 2007 03:15:26 -0800, "Dr. Strangemonde"
Hello again, one and all. Remember a week or two back when I asked if it was unhealthy for our ... let out a panicked yell at the last instant, and at first it looked as though all was copacetic; Yummi

Snipped
Glad to see a good ending to a tragedy story, Wish the little fellow all the best.
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