I have a Heinz 57 pup. A real doll. I have other dogs a boxer and a min-pin. Both were really potty trainable. She is a problem. I take her out and she might or may not go and come in and go. I know her father was a border collie, does this attention span problem have something to do with that? I work in a nursing home and she "works" all night with me and has her breaks but when I get home she is nuts and knows no training.

She is a very high strung dog! I got her at 12 weeks she is about 16 now. I have never had such a high energy dog what should I do? She goes to work with me 8 hours every night, I play with her, my other dogs play with her. I would like to start agility with her she is very very smart. I'm ready to start jogging to wear her out. So any help with the potty and exercie questions would be appreciated! Thanks!
was a border collie, does this attention span problem have something to do with that?

She's a baby! They have short attention spans.
I work in a nursing home and she "works" all night with me
and has her breaks but when I get home she is nuts and knows no training. She is a very high strung dog!

Are you confusing high energy with high strung? Border collies are one the breeds that needs about an hour of run time a day. Your puppy may not need quite an hour, but at least a solid half hour of the puppy running free, at its own pace. Is there a local dog park you can take her to? Generally, once that energy has dissipated, the dog is MUCH more amenable to training.
I got her at 12 weeks she is
about 16 now. I have never had such a high energy dog what should I do?

Exercise, exercise, exercise. Throw a ball for her for half an hour, make her run and bring it back. Let her run in a fenced area until she's pooped out!
She goes to work with me 8 hours every night, I play with her, my other dogs play with her. I would like to start agility with her she is very very smart.

You can start what is called puppy agility. It's basically a training program with limited physical stuff. The idea is to get that good working relationship started, and a bit of exposure like very short dog walks (maybe a foot high), tiny jumps (maybe a couple inches high), the tunnel, etc.
I'm ready to start jogging to wear her out. So any help with
the potty and exercie questions would be appreciated! Thanks!

She CANNOT be jogged until her growth plates have knit! For medium to large dogs, this is usually, at the earliest, a year of age. More often it is 18 months. When you take her in to check the state of her hips (with an x-ray, to see if they are dysplastic) you can have the vet check the growth plates. It's really important to get her hips checked before you start running, because if you run with a dog with dysplasia, it can make it worse. Elbows should be checked too. The hip/elbow check will be helpful for making sure she can take the stresses of agility, once she's older and is doing full jumps and such (again, which shouldn't be done until those growth plates are knit).
Now, a half hour or an hour of the puppy running at its own pace is far different than the stresses put on by jogging for a half hour or an hour. When free running, the dog runs, stops, sniffs, checks out other dogs, runs again, etc. You wouldn't make a 4 year old child run 2 miles every day, but you certainly would let them run around the yard with a friend until they are too tired to do anything else, even if the child covers the same amount of distance. It's the same philosophy.

As for the potty training, I think I missed the problem. I'll go back and see if I did, and if so respond again.
natalie

The turtle lives twixt plated decks
Which practically conceal its sex.
I think it clever of the turtle
In such a fix to be so fertile.
Ogden Nash
I have a Heinz 57 pup. A real doll. I have other dogs a boxer and a min-pin. Both were ... I take her out and she might or may not go and come in and go. I know her father[/nq]Basically, you need to let her know that when you go outside, she has to potty before she comes in. When she wakes up, take her out of the crate, rush her outside, let her pee on the spot you want her to pee, and praise praise praise her. Bring her inside. After she eats breakfast, wait maybe 10-15 minutes while watching her (does she sniff, circle around, look like she's getting ready to go?) and then take her outside to the spot she went before.

If she doesn't go in 5 minutes, just bring her back inside. Either watch her, or let her be in her crate for another 10 minutes, then take her out again. Chances are she'll need to go the second time, and won't need a third. You can also put some poop in the area you want her to go. When she starts to eliminate, give a cue word, like "hurry up" or "do duty" or "potty". Always praise when she finishes.

Make sure she goes out right away every time she wakes up, either from overnight, or from naps during the day. Let her out after eating. Let her out after playing. Let her out every hour to two hours, on top of letting her out after the situations I mentioned. She is old enough to go
2 hours, but because you're working on getting her trained, one hour mightwork better, just watch her signs. Always just take her out, give her 5 minutes, bring her back in, then take her out 10 minutes or 15 minutes later. Say "outside" or whatever you want when you are taking her out, so she learns what outside means. after* she's had an elimination trip, you can take her out to play.Ideally, you set her up so she won't make *any mistakes. The more mistakes they make, the harder it is to train. So keeping on top of her potty habits is in your favor, even if it means taking her out a LOT when you first start. As she learns, you can stretch out the time between potty breaks (while still following it after sleep/meals/play). Dogs usually are ok for an hour longer than they are old in months. Yours is, um 16 weeks? 4 months? So you should eventually be able to stretch it to taking her out every 5 hours on top of everything else.

If you want her to cue you to taking her out, you can hang some bells from the door, long enough for her to reach, and jingle them everytime you go outside. Most dogs pick it up and will nose the bells. And most go through a period (once they have started to train) of nosing the bells just to get outside! That passes for most dogs, because you'll know they won't need to go (have just been outside, say, in the last half hour) and can ignore it until it's more likely they need to go.
Definitely invest in a crate if you haven't already. Most dogs housetrain by 6 months, but can take up to a year to be completely reliable, leave at home all day and come home to no puddles reliable. The crate is handy, because if you need to go, you can leave your 7 month old for 8 hours crated, since dogs hate to mess their crates. The same dog left free running in the house may decide to pee.
good luck!
natalie

The turtle lives twixt plated decks
Which practically conceal its sex.
I think it clever of the turtle
In such a fix to be so fertile.
Ogden Nash
because if you need to go, you can leave your 7 month old for 8 hours crated, since dogs hate to mess their crates.

No, I feel that's too long a period of isolation (crate or no crate) for such a young puppy.
You'd be better off, IMO, asking a relative/friend/neighbour (or just hire someone) to look in on your dog at lunchtime and play with him for 15-20 mins, allow him to go to the toilet, stretch its legs etc. This will break the crating into 2 smaller, somewhat more acceptable periods.
Regards, James
because if you need to go, you can leave your 7 month old for 8 hours crated, since dogs hate to mess their crates.

No, I feel that's too long a period of isolation (crate or no crate) for such a young puppy.

It's not the best situation, obviously, but sometimes one needs to do it. So crate training can be the safest for a dog that age.

natalie

The turtle lives twixt plated decks
Which practically conceal its sex.
I think it clever of the turtle
In such a fix to be so fertile.
Ogden Nash