I took my cat for an ultrasound this morning and unfortunately, it didn't come back with good results that I was SO optimistically looking forward to receiving. Apparently, he has lumps and/or masses spreading throughout his abdomen. On the mezzentary (sp?)? The doctor said he either has FIP (feline infectious peritonitis) (sp?) or carcinoma - tosis? She has been really bothered by his weight loss and is now seeing why.

He really had a GREAT weekend - eating great and doesn't look sick at all. UGH!! She would like to either try and get some abdominal fluid to look at the cells or do exploratory surgery. I guess that's the only way to get a specific and more accurate diagnosis. Any insight on this new development? I feel SO badly for the little guy and I feel like I'm in denial...he seems fine. sigh
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I took my cat for an ultrasound this morning and unfortunately, it didn't come back with good results that I ... new development? I feel SO badly for the little guy and I feel like I'm in denial...he seems fine. sigh

I'm sorry to hear about your kitty.
My two cents...
FIP is a horrible, progressive illness with no cure. Cancer can sometimes be treated, but the treatment can be worse than the illness. Get what tests you need to be sure. If it IS FIP for certain (only a biopsy can tell for sure, don't let the vet guess, as they can guess wrong like mine did), the cat should be put to sleep, as it's all down hill from here and a very nasty way to die (systemic organ failure, fluid retention in the abdomen...). If it is cancer, the vet may be able to treat it or even get rid of it, depending on if the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes.
If the cancer has spread to the lymph nodes, I would not put my cat through treatment, but let him live in peace until his quality of life no longer justifies his suffering, then let him go in peace. If the cancer has not spread, I would get whatever treatment the vet suggests, including surgery and chemo.
I would also get a second, and possibly third, opinion before deciding on euthanasia. It saved my cat's life - it might save yours'.

Just my opinion. YMMV.
Best of luck and purrs to you and yours from me and mine...

~kaeli~
Jesus saves, Allah protects, and Cthulhu
thinks you'd make a nice sandwich.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
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Kaeli, how do cats get this? Is there anything we can do to keep them safe from it?
Kaeli, how do cats get this? Is there anything we can do to keep them safe from it?

FIP is a mutation of the relatively benign feline coronavirus. Most cats are exposed to the coronavirus at some point, and a very few of them will develop FIP later. The only way to prevent FIP is to make sure your cat is never exposed to the coronavirus, but most cats from catteries and shelters have already been exposed.
Keep in mind that FIP is very difficult to diagnose and most cats diagnosed with FIP do not have it. If it were me, I'd want to pursue another possible cause and treatment, because most of the time it isn't FIP. However, examination of the fluid may help a vet decide whether or not FIP is more likely.
I´m so sorry for you and your kitty. I hope for the best.
A friend of mine's cat just got diagnosed with FIP, supposedly the wet kind and in the last stages. The vet had a really crappy bedside manner and I told her she should get a second opinion anyway. Do you think it's possible the vet could have misdiagnosed something like this?

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
Lynn,
Sorry about the results. I'll keep my fingers crossed...

Karen
A friend of mine's cat just got diagnosed with FIP, supposedly the wet kind and in the last stages. The ... she should get a second opinion anyway. Do you think it's possible the vet could have misdiagnosed something like this?

It is very hard to mistake the last stages of effusive FIP for anything but, IMO.
I've seen photos, and they all have a characteristic massive bloating of the abdomen that makes it look like the cat got a sub-q to the tummy with about a gallon of water.
WARNING!!! WARNING!!! WARNING!!! WARNING!!! WARNING!!! GRAPHIC PHOTOS.
Not suitable for all audiences. Pictures of FIP cats and necropsy photo. First pic is cat while alive. Second pic is graphic necropsy, showing abdominal cavity. Last pic is live cat.

Abdominal distension caused by ascites:
http://www.cvm.okstate.edu /
~groups/students/web/2001/virology/RNAviruses/Coronaviridae/FIP abdomina l distension.jpg
Lesions of the effusive form on necropsy:
/
~groups/students/web/2001/virology/RNAviruses/Coronaviridae/FIP wet form .jpg
Fluffy opacity of the anterior chamber of the eye due to hemmorhage and fibrin clot formation characteristic of the non-effusive form:

/
~groups/students/web/2001/virology/RNAviruses/Coronaviridae/FIP fluffy o pacity anterior chamber eye.jpg

~kaeli~
Jesus saves, Allah protects, and Cthulhu
thinks you'd make a nice sandwich.
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/wildAtHeart
http://www.ipwebdesign.net/kaelisSpace
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