I have two TOTALLY indoor cats. I decided last year not to continue vaccinating them (they are 5). However, last summer I found a tame but unneutered male cat outside (approximately 1 year old) and had it neutered, got it tested and had him vaccinated. He is the most loving, sweet cat and I know at one time he was an indoor/outdoor cat because he always looks in the door and wants to come in. Totally heartbreaking. I didn't want to let him in because I thought he would be unhappy being a totally indoor cat and I didn't think it was fair for him to go in and out and my other two to stay inside. He has shelter, garage and basement, however closing the door on his adorable face is becoming a bit much for me!
My QUESTION is, is it safe to try and bring him in at this point with him being vaccinated (rabies, distemper and feline leukemia only) and my indoor cats NOT being vaccinated at all?? I would appreciate any answers or advice. Thank you so much..Janice
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I would have him tested again for feline leukemia and if he's OK, I would integrate with the other two in your house. I have done this twice myself. Gail
I would have him tested again for feline leukemia and if he's OK, I would integrate with the other two in your house. I have done this twice myself. Gail

I believe I remember reading that adult cats do not get feline leukemia in a lawsuit done by some Texan vet against all vets in Texas for malpractice. I´m too tired right now but I´ll try to look it up.
circa 25 Jan 2004 18:23:00 -0800, in rec.pets.cats.health+behav, Liz (Email Removed) said,
I would have him tested again for feline leukemia and ... in your house. I have done this twice myself. Gail

I believe I remember reading that adult cats do not get feline leukemia in a lawsuit done by some Texan vet against all vets in Texas for malpractice. I´m too tired right now but I´ll try to look it up.

It's not that they don't; it's that they are far, far less likely to become infected than kittens and adolescent cats.

Larua

I am Dyslexia of Borg,
Your ass will be laminated.
I have two TOTALLY indoor cats. I decided last year not to continue vaccinating them (they are 5). However, last summer I found a tame but

I think you should reconsider. I don't vaccinate my indoor cats for diseases only passed by contact with another infected cat, but I do keep them vaccinated for distemper and rabies.
Feline distemper is an airborne pathogen, so your cats will be at risk.

Rabies vaccination is usually required by law. A rabid bat could get into your house, or your cats could escape and encounter a rabid skunk, possum, or raccoon all of which often live in cities as well as in suburban and rural areas. Bats can fit through cracks only 1/4 inch wide, and in a friend's bat-infested house, they came out through the light fixtures when their exit from the attic was blocked up.

According to the CDC, any unvaccinated cat or dog that is bitten by a wild animal needs to be either euthanized or kept in isolation for 6 months.

jamie (Email Removed)
"There's a seeker born every minute."
I would have him tested again for feline leukemia and ... in your house. I have done this twice myself. Gail

I believe I remember reading that adult cats do not get feline leukemia in a lawsuit done by some Texan vet against all vets in Texas for malpractice. I´m too tired right now but I´ll try to look it up.

Found it...
The recommendation of annual Feline Leukemia Vaccine for adult cats, and cats that are not at risk is theft by deception, fraud by misrepresentation, misrepresentation by silence, and undue influence given the literature that states:
1. Cats over one year of age, if not previously infected, are immuneto Feline Leukemia virus infection whether they are vaccinated or not.
2. Adjuvanted Feline leukemia vaccine can cause Injection SiteFibrosarcomas, a fatal type of cancer. This type of cancer is thought to occur in 1:10,000 cats vaccinated.
3. Only cats less than one year of age and at risk cats should bevaccinated against Feline Leukemia virus.
A reasonable client would not elect this vaccine for their cat if given this information.
http://www.petresource.com/Articles%20of%20Interest/texas vet.htm

There´s another copy of this lawsuit somewhere in the internet with all the studies attached to back up before Court what this Dr. Rogers states.
I believe I remember reading that adult cats do not get feline leukemia

Another one of your utterly stupid, asinine and dangerous statements.... No one posts more erroneous and dangerous information in this group than you... Do you even realize you continuously post dangerous information? Do you do it intentionally, or are you really that clueless?

Adult cats can* and certainly *do become infected with FeLV....

You said you were in "research in the pharmaceutical industry".... Then you should be well aware of vaccine efficacy studies required for licensing in which a significant propor­tion of unvaccinated adult controls became infected when they were housed with FeLV-infected cats....
in a lawsuit done by some Texan vet against all vets in Texas
for malpractice. I´m too tired right now but I´ll try to look it up.

Its not surprising you have a knack for finding quotes and articles written by nut cases.... Birds of a feather... Did it ever occur to you that you should look up and verify the accuracy of your information before you post it.... No wonder you're not in research any more...

Now, do the cats of the world a favor and take a nap... a real long nap... say about 20 years or so... May be about 400 mg of potassium IV will help you sleep a little better....
Found it... The recommendation of annual Feline Leukemia Vaccine for adult cats, and cats that are not at risk is ... year of age, if not previously infected, are immune to Feline Leukemia virus infection whether they are vaccinated or not.

I looked at the site where this is quoted, but I don't see any literature cited to support this claim. I find it hard to believe, since I know of adult cats that have contracted FeLV.
2. Adjuvanted Feline leukemia vaccine can cause Injection Site Fibrosarcomas, a fatal type of cancer. This type of cancer is ... 3. Only cats less than one year of age and at risk cats should be vaccinated against Feline Leukemia virus.

If a cat is more than one year old and so presumably immune, what would be an "at risk" cat?
A reasonable client would not elect this vaccine for their cat if given this information. http://www.petresource.com/Articles%20of%20Interest/texas vet.htm There´s another copy of this lawsuit somewhere in the internet with all the studies attached to back up before Court what this Dr. Rogers states.

I'm sure many people would be interested to see these studies.
Found it... The recommendation of annual Feline Leukemia Vaccine for ... Feline Leukemia virus infection whether they are vaccinated or not.

I looked at the site where this is quoted, but I don't see any literaturecited to support this claim.

No surprise... Liz has a long established history of manipulating and dilberately misinterpreting statements and studies to suit her obsessive agenda. Remember the CRF survey and the vaccine-CRF study? She changed the original authors' conclusions completely into the conclusions she thought they should be.. She even said she includes "facts" the original authors "should have" included..
I find it hard to believe, since I know of adult cats
that have contracted FeLV.

So do most of us who actually work with real live cats.. Liz is what's known as an armchair commando... No actual experience... She just regurgitates others' information with her own spin on it... valid or not as long as it supports her agenda..
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