Anyone know something about these? Luke, Patrick? (Chris?, Kurt?) They are also known as Canopy Goanas.
Specifically I'm looking for information on what strata of the canopy they live in (high, low, etc) and diet.
I'm making a list of high canopy dwelling lizards that aren't strictly omnivorous to settle a debate.
So far I've got Jackson's Chameleons, Green tree monitors, maybe some anoles. I'd like to add some more...
-Z
Anyone know something about these? Luke, Patrick? (Chris?, Kurt?) They are also known as Canopy Goanas.

All I know about them, unfortunately, is that they got that dumb specific epithet from Wells and Wellington...
So far I've got Jackson's Chameleons, Green tree monitors, maybe some anoles. I'd like to add some more...

There are definitely a lot of anoles in that cateogry... I don't know of any that eat plant matter, and there're dozens (well, at least a dozen, anyways) of exclusively crown-dwelling species. I think there are some geckos that'd qualify, as well... many of the arboreal ones eat fruit, but I don't think the smaller genera (Lygodactylus, Hemidactylus, Sphaerodactylus, probably some other dactylus) do.

Patrick Alexander
Anyone know something about these? Luke, Patrick? (Chris?, Kurt?) They are also known as Canopy Goanas. Specifically I'm looking for information on what strata of the canopy they live in (high, low, etc) and diet.

Like any other monitor, diet is going to be anything they can catch and cram into their mouths - a lot of insects, the occasional nest of bird's eggs or baby birds, small arboral lizards, snakes and frogs, small possums and sugar gliders, maybe slugs.
I really do not know how high up they live. There has probably been no in depth study of the behavior of these lizards in the wild, so it is likely no one knows how high up they live. One report says that of four captured, three were on the ground and one was 5 meters up a tree. There is probably a strong sampling bias, however, as humans are not likely to catch lizards living way up in trees. If they are like other arboral monitors, they will spend their time at all different heights in their search for food, and will probably shelter in tree hollows or behind loose pieces of bark.
I'm making a list of high canopy dwelling lizards that aren't strictly omnivorous to settle a debate. So far I've got Jackson's Chameleons, Green tree monitors, maybe some anoles. I'd like to add some more...[/nq]Varanus beccari (sp?) is so closely related to the green tree monitor it probably behaves the same. There is another group of small monitors, including V. timorensis, V. auffenbergi, V. similis, and V. scalaris (the spotted tree monitors) that spend much of their time up in trees. V. tristis and V. varius (lace monitor) are known to climb a lot and are often found up trees, but are more frequently encountered on the ground. V. salvadorii (crocodile monitor) is thought to be rather arboreal, although data on wild behavior is lacking.

V. gilleni (pigmy mulga monitor) and a few closely related species are commonly found up trees, but these are usually mulga tress in the outback, hardly what you would consider a canopy. V. olivaceous spends most of its time high in the trees, but it is one of only two monitors that are omnivorous. V. albigularis has been known to spend the entire dry season up in a tree, but when they are active, they spend a lot of time foraging on the ground. The indicus complex (including V.

jobiensis, the peach throat monitor, and V. doreanus, the blue tailed monitor, in addition to V. indicus, the mangrove monitor) scale trees frequently, but are just as likely to be found in the water or on land. The young of V. komodoensis (Komodo dragon) spend most of their time high in trees with occasional visits to ground level, but these become primarily terrestrial as they get older.
As for other lizards, other than the geckos, chameleons, and anolis lizards already mentioned, I've heard about some central or south American alligator lizards that are supposed to be largely arboreal. I do not know much about them (other than that I'd someday like to get a few, beautiful animals). There are the gliding lizards of the genus Draco as well. I don't know their diet, but these agamids spend nearly all their lives high in the trees. I suspect there are a bunch of mostly arboreal agamids, but I don't know the details (mountain dragons? helmeted dragons?).
Luke
You and Patrick ROCK!
Thanks so much for the info guys, it is appreciated much.

Tonight I will use it to DESTROY my opponent! (or just to make a few polite, thoughtful points...)
-Z