I'm a little interested. Venomous snakes with no venom. Seems like you can't go wrong. But I still want to make sure I cover all my bases and do all my research before I decide to purchase one. So, a few questions if there is anyone out there with venomoid experience..
#1 - I was told by a few people that venomoids don't do well because their venom is used to partially break down and digest their food. Thus causing health problems and short life span.
#2 - A question/concern I had of my own. Now this may sound silly. But I was wondering if it's possible for the snake to regenerate it's venom glands over time? It would suck pretty bad if I have a venomoid and one day it bites me and I get envenomated and die. Like I said, you're all probably laughing at me for asking this..but a wise man once told me, "The only stupid question is the one that wasn't asked.".
That's all. Thanks! =)
- DT
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I'm a little interested. Venomous snakes with no venom. Seems like youcan't go wrong. But I still want to ... man once told me, "The only stupid questionis the one that wasn't asked.". That's all. Thanks! =) - DT

Although #1 has not yet been proven, #2 has. Young snakes have been known to regenerate venom glands. Usually its because of an incomplete surgery, but in some cases, they just regenerate.
Have you worked with someone who works with venomous snakes? Do you feel you have the knowledge for such an animal? Do you feel you can treat a venomoid just like a hot (which is how ALL venomoids should be treated, regardless)?

-cat
I'm a little interested. Venomous snakes with no venom. Seems like youcan't go wrong.

Sure you can. It's like how you should handle a firearm as if it was loaded, even if you're "sure" it's not.
#1 - I was told by a few people that venomoids don't do well because their venom is used to partially break down and digest their food. Thus causing health problems and short life span.

We have a couple of folks in our local herp club with quite a few venomoids copperheads and cobras, probably more species that I can't recall off the top of my head. I want to say most have been alive for over a decade, which seems pretty good.
#2 - A question/concern I had of my own. Now this may sound silly. But Iwas wondering if it's possible ... would suck pretty bad if I have a venomoid and one day it bitesme and I get envenomated and die.

Wouldn't be likely to happen (you dying) if you handle the snake properly. Venomoids should be treated as if they were still "hot." It would have a very small chance of happening if you weren't freehandling the snake, for example. But yes, as ChaosCat mentioned, it's not unheard of for venomoids to "all of a sudden" regain toxicity.
Like I said, you're all probably laughing at me for asking this

Not laughing, but wondering your reasons for wanting a venomoid if you're looking at getting one because of the inherent beauty or other characteristics of the snake, then you wouldn't have a problem treating it as though it were venomous. But if you're looking for something to impress people with (by handling what appears to be a highly dangerous animal and could be), you're probably going to get yourself or someone else hurt.
..but a wise man once told me, "The only stupid question is the one that wasn't asked.".

I don't know if he was a wise man so much as a plagiarist! Emotion: smile
Chris
http://www.mcmartinville.com
#2 - A question/concern I had of my own. Now this may sound silly. But Iwas wondering if it's possible ... laughingat me for asking this..but a wise man once told me, "The only stupid questionis the one that wasn't asked.".

Yes, it's possible or the snake's vemon glands weren't properly removed.

And I've also heard it's a cruel procedure
I'm a little interested. Venomous snakes with no venom. Seems like youcan't go wrong. But I still want to ... their venom is used to partially break down and digest their food. Thus causing health problems and short life span.

In my Vertebrate Zoology class I took my senior yr in college, I was taught that the venom did, in fact, aid in digestion. The class was also taught by an avid herper. However, even if the venom does aid in digestion, is it actually necessary for adequate digestion? I would suspect no.

griffin
Since we are on the topic of venomous snakes and such..

Myself, my sister, and her best friend are all herp lovers. Our friend works at a local park (Bluebonnet Swamp), as the herp caretaker. One day a lady and her son came in with a snake. They said they had found it and had been keeping it for a couple of days, playing with it and such, and that if was so "friendly" and docile. She brought it in, and lo and behold, it was a copperhead. Can you imagine??? playing with a snake and not even realizing it was venomous??? Lucky them! I was amazed by the story.

griffin
copperhead. Can you imagine??? playing with a snake and not even realizing it was venomous??? Lucky them! I was amazed by the story.

Playing with it, fine. Just don't step on it! Emotion: smile
copperhead. Can you imagine??? playing with a snake and not evenrealizing it was venomous??? Lucky them! I was amazed by the story.

Playing with it, fine. Just don't step on it! Emotion: smile

well, its not like they knew it was a Copperhead. they were playing with it like it was a gartersnake.
copperhead. Can you imagine??? playing with a snake and not even realizing it was venomous??? Lucky them! I was amazed by the story.

Playing with it, fine. Just don't step on it! Emotion: smile

I once sat on one. It was dark and I was out in the woods camping. Sat down to untie the bearbag and thought "what the hell is that squirming under my thigh?" Got up and turned my headlamp on it. I'm not sure who was most likely to have a heart attack it or me. It lit out of there fast as it could slither. I just stood around like an idiot with my mouth open.
Luckily copperheads are among the least likely of our venomous snakes to bite, even when agitated.
-Z
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