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In actual fact my obedience trainer has just called me to say that he thinks Jake could move up to his Advanced Class - I am so pleased.

Maybe you could get him to work on the following things BEFOREHAND?

"He also plays up more on the lead - he tries to chase cars and if someone comes up near him rears up at them (or tries to) or worse still lies down and stares at them and won't budge."

"Some of it I put down to his not being used to lead walking, on very busy streets, with car headlights, people walking to bus stops etc."

Just a thought.
Tsk tsk tsk.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
The Frivolity of Evil:
http://www.city-journal.org/html/14 4 oh to be.html
Hi Alison,
Thanks, I didn't expect his reaction.
Although I have to work full time, I made sure I got a job where I would be able to get home for lunch each day. We go into the garden (whatever the weather) and play, normally fetching or catching a toy. On occasion, I take him 'round the local field, so he doesn't do too bad.
Also, my friend, who is a very experienced dog handler and trainer (with 3 dogs of her own) is going to be able to let him out and take him out in the New Year.
I would appreciate you e-mailing me the web addresses.

Lynda
Yes, I will be mentioning it. He's very good so I'm sure he'll be able to offer me some advice.
Lynda
Yes, I will be mentioning it. He's very good so I'm sure he'll be able to offer me some advice.

If he were that good, Lynda, you probably wouldn't still be having these problems.
There's a flea in the ointment somewhere, and I don't think it's your dog.
Anyway, good luck with Jake!
I'm bowing out.

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
The Frivolity of Evil:
http://www.city-journal.org/html/14 4 oh to be.html
Hi Alison, Thanks, I didn't expect his reaction.

What did you really expect, Lynda? Someone to tell you how well your dog seemed to be doing?
()
We go into the garden (whatever the weather) and play, normally fetching or catching a toy.

Maybe instead of spending that time on "play," you could spend it on OBEDIENCE TRAINING, specifically, dealing with the following problems:

"He also plays up more on the lead - he tries to chase cars and if someone comes up near him rears up at them (or tries to) or worse still lies down and stares at them and won't budge."

"Some of it I put down to his not being used to lead walking, on very busy streets, with car headlights, people walking to bus stops etc."

(

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
The Frivolity of Evil:
http://www.city-journal.org/html/14 4 oh to be.html
To be fair, I only went back to work last Monday and my last obedience class was last Sunday - I didn't have any idea I had these problems then. So hopefuly we can address them.
Out of interest - how would you deal with the issues, I really would like to get them sorted.
Cheers,
Lynda
To be fair, I only went back to work last Monday and my last obedience class was last Sunday - ... them. Out of interest - how would you deal with the issues, I really would like to get them sorted.

First, I said that I'm bowing out, Lynda, and I am. Too many cooks spoil the broth. Plus, we don't appear to communicate very well.

Second, I don't put a lot of faith in anything you say here, and I wouldn't want to create even more problems for you, by "misinterperating" something you said again, etc.
Third, you said that you already* have a professional trainer (the type of training he professes is unknown to me at this time), and *he is who you should be dealing with, openly and honestly.

Describe your current problems to him, and tell him that before he moves you into any "Advanced Class," you'd first like him to work on dealing with the following Novice issues:
"He also plays up more on the lead - he tries to chase cars and if someone comes up near him rears up at them (or tries to) or worse still lies down and stares at them and won't budge."

Etc.
Again, good luck!
()

Handsome Jack Morrison
*gently remove the detonator to reply via e-mail
The Frivolity of Evil:
http://www.city-journal.org/html/14 4 oh to be.html
Please keep in mind that walking on lead is a very good thing. it teaches the dog that he needs to follow you... that you are his alpha, that he needs to do what you say.
Not to mention that a dog should only run loose in a safe, fenced in area.. you don't want something to happen to him. Eventually he'll be reliable in call backs, but you can't control what other people or animals will do.
AND, if someone was attacked, there's no way you'd find me in that area again. Don't take the chance.
Nicole
. So, I am loath (even though I have been doing it for
Original Message

Sent: Saturday, December 04, 2004 10:18 PM
Subject: Re: Walking/running with Border Collie
Please keep in mind that walking on lead is a very good thing. it teaches the dog that he needs to follow you... that you are his alpha, that heneeds to do what you say.

Boy, I really disagree with this way of looking at training.

I look at leashwork as more of a partnership than an "alpha" thing. I've seen some seriously submissive dogs have terrible pulling issues on lead, and I've seen some fairly dominant dogs have no trouble at all adjusting to leash work.
Not to mention that a dog should only run loose in a safe, fenced in area.. you don't want something to happen to him. Eventually he'll be reliable in call backs, but you can't control what other people or animals will do.

This part I do agree with.
Tara
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