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Perhaps I was naive. But when I invested in my pet's policy it was with the thought toward having some assistance in case of an expensive emergency. If procedures aren't well covered, why
bother even having insurance...or from the company's perspective, claiming you provide it? To me, there's no honest logic in claiming that a provider provides insurance if those emergencies aren't covered.People buy pet insurance so that there is back-up during expensive emergencies. But when the yearly premium is more than the expensive emergency, there is no back up.
ava
See my reply below - that's not what I said, ... out more than they take in for eachperson's policy, well..

Perhaps I was naive. But when I invested in my pet's policy it was with the thought toward having some ... during expensive emergencies. But when the yearly premium is more than the expensive emergency, there is no back up. ava

IMO, it's pot luck. Most years one wouldn't need it, but then finally some year - or years, perhaps bam! - pet gets ill, vet bills are large, & one's claim(s) may make it worthwhile - at least for that year. Over the long run, the insurance companies have to be the ones who make out, otherwise they wouldn't be in business. Look at car insurance (granted, necessary Vs. optional) - how many thousands upon thousands upon thousands in premiums have I paid over the last 30 or so years? And how much have I gotten back in claims? (Perhaps about 20% of what I've paid in over the years, is my guess - mostly from one incident when a huge tree limb fell onto my brand-new car in a heavy snowstorm!)
Cathy (who doesn't have vet insurance for her cats)

"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
IMO, it's pot luck. Most years one wouldn't need it, but then finally some year - or years, perhaps bam! - pet gets ill, vet bills are large, & one's claim(s) may make it worthwhile - at least for that year.

But in the case of this company, one's pet would have to have multiple illnesses in one year..I've never studied this...but doesn't that seem a lot less likely than animals who have one expensive illness?
Over the long run, the insurance companies have to be the ones who make out, otherwise they wouldn't be in ... guess - mostly from one incident when a huge tree limb fell onto my brand-new car in a heavy snowstorm!)

Car isurance is a great analogy. You are covered for repairs, or close to it. Isn't that what "insurance" means?
Cathy (who doesn't have vet insurance for her cats)

Smart Cathy! Emotion: smile
ava
IMO, it's pot luck. Most years one wouldn't need it, ... may make it worthwhile - at least for that year.

But in the case of this company, one's pet would have to have multiple illnesses in one year..I've never studied this...but doesn't that seem a lot less likely than animals who have one expensive illness?

Yeah, it would seem so (less likely to have multiple illnesses/claims in one year Vs. one biggy).

Well, I must've spent a good $5K on one late cat's vet bills over the course of several years (I quit keeping tabs after it hit $1500) - she had some chronic illnesses. But by the time I realized that insurance might help out, I didn't even bother, because of pre-existing conditions.

Cathy

"Staccato signals of constant information..."
("The Boy in the Bubble") Paul Simon
on 25 Dec 2003:
Well, I must've spent a good $5K on one late cat's vet bills over the course of several years (I ... illnesses. But by the time I realized that insurance might help out, I didn't even bother, because of pre-existing conditions.

Same here, re Shadow (~$3000 in one year alone). After reading all of this discussion, I'm going to cancel Shamrock's ins. and just put the money into an account for all the cats. We have VPI also (Shamrock only, never got around to adding Bonnie yet)

Cheryl
"I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but still I can do something. I will not refuse to do the something I can do." - Helen Keller