Here is a small description of the environment and expectations that I have.

I live in the house and we have a fenced yard, but I don't think that dog will live outside. I have 3 cats, who have never lived with the dog and I am sure that they will really hate it in the beginning. The house has a finished basement and that is where I will have some space available for the dog when I am not at home. I will be fine if dog spends time outside, but I am not sure my wife will ever agree to that.

I have never had a dog in my life. I work from 9. I think I can spend
30 minutes to walk a dog every evening, when I come from work. I willbe able to take time for dog obidience class.
I think I will like smart dogs such as Labrador Retriever and Doberman Pincher. I am looking for dogs which require little maintenance when it comes to their coats. It is likely to be a dog from a rescue organization, since that is what my wife wants to do. I don't want to get a dog affraied of everybody and that is what I expect to see at the rescue. At the same time I am not sure I will be able to handle dominant or agressive dog since I have no experience.

Although it seems silly, I like Doberman Pincher, because of its defense abilities and his look. I definetly don't want to have vicious dog, since I am sure I will not be able to handle it.

It is not going to be a puppy. It is either going to be a yong or an adult dog. Is it really difficult to train an adult dog?
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I live in the house and we have a fenced yard, but I don't think that dog will live outside.

That's a start - you'll get more people here (and in rescue) on your side if you change that to "but the dog won't live outside." In fact, most rescues won't adopt to you if you plan such a thing.
I have 3 cats, who have never lived with the dog and I am sure that they will really hate it in the beginning.

Probably, but you can skew the odds somewhat by adopting an adult dog from a rescue who has fostered him in a home with cats.
The house has a finished basement and that is where I will have some space available for the dog when I am not at home.

Will he have some access to the outside, like a dog door? Can you or your wife come home at lunch time? It's doable, I know, but it's going to depend greatly upon the dog.
I will be fine if dog spends time outside, but I am not sure my wife will ever agree to that.

I don't understand - are you talking about outside during times when everyone is away from home? There can be problems with that - again, depending upon the dog and the circumstances.
I have never had a dog in my life. I work from 9. I think I can spend 30 minutes to walk a dog every evening, when I come from work. I will be able to take time for dog obidience class.

Good for you for planning to take an obedience class. Most dogs, however, need more than 30 minutes of exercise per day, especially the breeds you've shown a liking for.
I think I will like smart dogs such as Labrador Retriever and Doberman Pincher.

They're all smart in their own way. Some dogs are way too smart, and when left underexercised and understimulated, will make up their own problem-solving games. Your house, your yard, and possibly your dog himself could suffer the consequences.
I am looking for dogs which require little maintenance when it comes to their coats.

It's almost a mantra: sweep or upkeep, broom or groom. All dogs shed, so, for example, with the dogs you've mentioned you'll be doing some maintenance on the floor with a broom and on your clothes with duct tape.
It is likely to be a dog from a rescue organization, since that is what my wife wants to do.

Keep her!
I don't want to get a dog affraied of everybody and that is what I expect to see at the rescue. At the same time I am not sure I will be able to handle dominant or agressive dog since I have no experience.

Good rescues evaluate dogs while they're in their care (maybe you're confusing rescues with shelters?). My dog Friday came from a rescue and had spent some time living in a foster home with other dogs and some older kids. So, I had a reasonable idea that he'd do well with them.
Although it seems silly, I like Doberman Pincher, because of its defense abilities and his look. I definetly don't want to have vicious dog, since I am sure I will not be able to handle it.

I know plenty of Doberman Pinschers, and not one of them is vicious. Obedience training and socialisation are very important with all dogs.
It is not going to be a puppy. It is either going to be a yong or an adult dog. Is it really difficult to train an adult dog?

Not at all. Almost every dog in my daycare came from a rescue situation. I really like your idea of adopting an older dog - at least a year old is a good jumping-off point.
Instead of focusing on breeds, I'd suggest going and meeting various dogs at shelters and rescues. IMO, you're going to have to bump up your exercise estimation, though.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I live in the house and we have a fenced yard, but I don't think that dog will live outside. ... will be fine if dog spends time outside, but I am not sure my wife will ever agree to that.

Good for her. Dogs are pack animals, they need to be with other living beings as much as possible.
I have never had a dog in my life. I work from 9. I think I can spend 30 minutes ... Labrador Retriever and Doberman Pincher. I am looking for dogs which require little maintenance when it comes to their coats.

Fair enough.
It is likely to be a dog from a rescue organization, since that is what my wife wants to do. I don't want to get a dog affraied of everybody and that is what I expect to see at the rescue.

Why is that what you expect to see at rescue? It certainly CAN happen, but it should be expected. The typical rescue dog is an adolescent where the person who had it simply could not or would not provide the kind of structure and attention a dog needs. Some are fairly "needy" as a result of being isolated e.g. in a yard. But rescues that have been fostered are usually normal by the time they are offered for adoption. Or at least in responsible rescues. There are irresponsible rescues, just as there are irresponsible breeders. But you should be able to find a responsible rescue.
At the same time I am not sure I will be able to handle dominant or agressive dog since I ... I definetly don't want to have vicious dog, since I am sure I will not be able to handle it.

A Doberman is not a "vicious" dog, but it is probably not the right dog for you. I think the important part of the puzzle we are missing here is personality. Doberman and Labrador are extremely different in temperament. Or they are if they are true to their breed. The best source of puzzling through how to match your personality to a dog is still "The Right Dog for You" by Daniel Tortora. HOWEVER it is not the right book for choosing a breed because the breed descriptions are out of date ( breeds change over time). A better source for breed descriptions is Michele Welton's "Your Purebred Puppy" by Michele Welton (Lowell) or "A Perfect Match" by Chris Walkowicz.
You may find my article on choosing a dog to be helpful: http://dogplay.com/GettingDog/choosing.html
It is not going to be a puppy. It is either going to be a yong or an adult dog. Is it really difficult to train an adult dog?

It does depend on the dog, but it also depends on the puppy. Older dogs are really great choices for those new to sharing their lives with dogs. They are generally much less work than puppies are.

My newest dog, Freeway, has been with me just over a year. He was about a year and a half when I got him. He is a mixed breed. He is a visiting pet (goes to health care facilities to cheer people up), learning agility (obstacle course for dogs), and herding (just "graduated" from the lowest level class).

Diane Blackman
There is no moral victory in proclaiming to abhor violence while preaching with violent words.
http://dog-play.com / http://dogplayshops.com /
Why is that what you expect to see at rescue? It certainly CAN happen, but it should be expected. The typical rescue dog is an adolescent where

ACK
Make that
Why is that what you expect to see at rescue? It certainly CAN happen, but it should NOT be expected. The typical rescue dog is an adolescent

Diane Blackman
There is no moral victory in proclaiming to abhor violence while preaching with violent words.
http://dog-play.com / http://dogplayshops.com /
I can see you've already had some sound advice . I just want to add a couple of points.
I live in the house and we have a fenced yard, but I don't thinkthat

dog will live outside. I have 3 cats, who have never lived with the dog and I am sure that they will really hate it in the beginning.>>>

I bet they will Be very careful introducing the new dog. Don't let him chase
the cats, keep him on a lead if necessary. Make sure they have a room where the dog can't go. Invest in a Feliway diffuser, it helps cats relax.
The house has a finished basement and that is where I will have somespace available for the dog when I am not at home. I will be fine if dog spends time outside, but I am not sure my wife will ever agree tothat.>>.

Listen to your wife:) There's no need to put the dog in the basement either
when you go out. If you do this, he will associate the place with you abandoning
him and could very likely become stressed and anxious at being left in it.
I have never had a dog in my life. I work from 9. I think I canspend 30 minutes to walk a dog every evening, when I come from work. Iwill be able to take time for dog obidience class.>>

Will your wife be helping you with the dog? 30 minutes won't be enough for a
youngish dog . Middled- aged dogs might not mind so much depending on their breed. Also if he is being left all day, he will need a walk in the morning too.
Perhaps a dog walker could walk him in the day. Dogs need off leash walks too.
It is not going to be a puppy. It is either going to be a yong oran adult dog. Is it really difficult to train an adult dog?>>.

No, it can be easy if you know what you are doing. I adopted a rescue dog two years ago and he was very quick to pick things up using reward and positive methods. Sometimes dogs have habits that take a little while for them to unlearn , it depends on the individual dog. Alison
Good rescues evaluate dogs while they're in their care (maybe you're confusing rescues with shelters?).

I think I confuse the two. What's the difference?
Good rescues evaluate dogs while they're in their care (maybe you're confusing rescues with shelters?).

I think I confuse the two. What's the difference?[/nq]A shelter is a place where people and dog catcher trucks drop off unwanted or stray dogs. A rescue is an organization that gets dogs from shelters (and sometimes from owners who no longer want them) and then adopts the dogs out to new owners. The difference is that the shelters are basically just holding pens. The dogs are in kennels and get basic care until they are either claimed by an owner, adopted by a new owner or put to sleep if not taken before the shelter runs out of room.

Rescues generally place their dogs in foster homes where the dogs live in houses with families. They generally do some temperament evaluation and have vets examine the dogs. There is a push to housetrain and do some basic obedience work with the dog so that it is more likely to be adopted and stay adopted. There is also a push to screen and educate potential adopters so that the dogs end up in homes that are a good match for the breed and the individual dog, safety issues are minimized, and the dog will be more likely to stay in the home forever.

Rescues also generally require adopters to let them know if the dog doesn't work out so they can find a new home for it rather than have it end up in a shelter again.

Paula
Persons with names like Sierra, Sequoia, Auburn, and Rainbow can't sing the Blues no matter how many men they shoot in Memphis.
My newest dog, Freeway, has been with me just over a year. He was about a year and a half ... facilities to cheer people up), learning agility (obstacle course for dogs), and herding (just "graduated" from the lowest level class).

That sounds like fun for a dog. I did not know it existed!
so, what should I do?
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