Hi I'm new here, although I've been "lurking" and reading the posts for a few days. I have two male cats (brothers) Scooby and Sylvester who will make a year on May 1st. I have tried all types of different litter, the scoopable, non-scoop, scented, unscented. I guess I'm just curious as to what works best for everyone else who is a cat owner. The past two weeks I have switched to the non-scoopable Tidy Cat and find myself having to dump it and hose it out, dry, refill daily.

Is this the best method? When I use the scoopable litter it leaves little clumps and just never seems very clean to me, which is why I'm emptying it on a daily basis. Thanks for your suggestions! Also, if I can ask one more question, I bathe them once a week, is that too often?
As you can tell, I am a fairly new "mommy" of these kittens so I need all the advice I can get.
Christina

http://www.geocities.com/christinamarie29/ourpage.html
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Hi I'm new here, although I've been "lurking" and reading the posts for a few days. I have two male ... am a fairly new "mommy" of these kittens so I need all the advice I can get. Christina http://www.geocities.com/christinamarie29/ourpage.html

With scoopable litter there should be no need to change the litter for a month or so. Organic litter such as Swheat Scoop or World's Best may be healthier as it has no silica and other chemicals. Cats are self cleaning so bathing them is optional.
Adam
Hi I'm new here, although I've been "lurking" and reading the posts for a few days. I have two male ... tell, I am a fairly new "mommy" of these kittens so I need all the advice I can get. Christina

Responding to your question on bathing: My cats are indoor-only cats, and I never bathe them. Cats are very clean animals "self cleaning," as Adam so aptly described it. Unless you have problems with fleas or some health issues, I would be surprised if you needed to bathe your cats so frequently.

MaryL
Thank you Mary. Mine are also indoor cats. I don't have a flea problem with them at all...but like I said I'm new to having cats and I was reading somewhere that it was okay to bathe them once a week (or recommended) if there was a problem with someone in the house with allergies. They don't have any health problems, either. Thanks for your response.

Chris
Hi I'm new here, although I've been "lurking" and reading the posts for a few days. I have two male ... can tell, I am a fairly new "mommy" of these kittens so I need all the advice I can get.

I used clumping clay litter for 8 years until this summer, when I switched to wood products. This year I tested pine shavings, cedar shavings and wood pellets. My 2 adult cats had no problem with the switchover, and neither did my 2 kittens who were previously cared for at the shelters with clay litter. I wish I had discovered wood shavings years ago.
The are so many advantages that the choice of pine/cedar shavings over any type of clay litter is quite overwhelming: far more moisture absorbent (less maintenance), far lower cost of use, far lighter weight (easier to handle), superior odor abatement, zero ammonia formation, easier disposal, and even recycleable as a landscape mulch. You can easily scoop out the fecal matter from pine/cedar/shavings too; quicker than with clay litter because the shavings can quickly be pushed aside to find the ***. Although the tracking of wood shavings is more visible than clay, it's much easier to clean up. This tracking is especially easier to clean up than clumping clay litter if it should become scattered over a damp basement floor.

Both pine and cedar shavings are sold not only at pet stores but at places like K-Mart and Wal-Mart for -$9 per 2 cu. ft. bag. At pet stores expect those prices to be up to 30% higher. Don't look for wood shavings in the area of the stores where cat products are kept though; find them where the stuff for rabbits, ferrets and hamsters is kept.
Spent (urine containing) cedar shavings will last far longer than pine as a landscape mulch.
Although both types of wood shavings are amazingly cheap, pine's cost of usage is at least half the cost of cedar mostly because it expands to twice its volume; the minute you transfer it from its packaging to the litter box (higher compression in its packaging).
With regards to wood pellets, I would steer people away from them; especially the expensive pine ones marketed as cat litter. If you choose wood pellets though, buy the cheap ones that are marketed as fuel for stoves; sold at places like Home Depot during the heating season. My main complaint with wood pellets is that they break down to a dust that gets tracked further away from the litterbox than does shavings. That dust also becomes an airborn contaminant of the indoor environment that you share with your cat(s). My other complaint of wood pellets (not shavings) is that a litter bed of it weighs almost as much as that of clay. The positives of wood pellets are its equalities with wood shavings: moisture absorption, odor abatement, zero ammonia formation, very low usage cost, and disposal in the landscape.
All types of wood products can be used in an enclosed litter box for further odor abatement. That's how I use the wood shavings.
I use Shweat Scoop which is a scoopable, natural litter made from wheat and I've been very happy with it.
Also, if I can ask one more question, I bathe them once a week, is that too often?

Why are you bathing your cats? Cats do not need to be bathed unless they get into something that they can't get off their fur themselves. If you're just bathing your cats to bathe them, it robs their skin of the oils it needs.
As you can tell, I am a fairly new "mommy" of these kittens so I need all the advice I can get.

Congrats Emotion: smile
Lauren

See my cats: http://community.webshots.com/album/56955940rWhxAe Raw Diet Info: http://www.holisticat.com/drjletter.html http://www.geocities.com/rawfeeders/ForCatsOnly.html Declawing Info: http://www.wholecat.com/articles/claws.htm
Cats do not need to be bathed unless they get into something

How true.
More of a shower then a bath when they get into something they're not supposed to around here (okay, just a squirt bottle)

Just sit through this NRA meeting Marge, and if you still don't think guns are great then we'll argue some more.
I use a cat litter called Lasting Pride. It's made by Cat's Pride and you can find it at Walmart for a decent price. It's the Scoopable kind and does a fairly good job of clumping.

Panther TEK: Staying On Top Of All Your Computer Needs! www.members.cox.net/catprotector/panthertek
Cat Galaxy: All Cats, All The Time!
www.catgalaxymedia.com
With scoopable litter there should be no need to change the litter for a month or so. Organic litter such ... may be healthier as it has no silica and other chemicals. Cats are self cleaningso bathing them is optional. Adam

My two cats are 10 yo and 4yo. Each have only been bathed once each. The 4 yo when I first found her, covered with fleas, lice and dirt; the 10 yo when he got into some tar.
Linda
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