I have a cat who loves to be outdoors. I have a neighbor who says my cat gets on his truck and ruins the finish. Never mind the fact that there are other cats in the neighborhood and that the neighbor has a garage, but chooses not to park his truck in it.
If I keep the cat in, she gets very antsy and frustrated. This one neighbor is the only plaintiff.
I've thought of some solutions:
1. Tether the cat outside. But she likes to chase critters, and there isa porch with steps, so she could hang herself.

2. Keep her inside anyway. Is this cruel and unusual? She is veryunhappy about being made to stay inside.

3. Find a new owner. Any suggestions of how to do that? I live in theRaleigh, NC area. I would want the new owner to allow her outside, or I haven't solved the problem.
Thanks for any help offered.
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I vote for keeping her in. Cats will adapt to anything in time.

As for tying your cat outside, in addition to her possibly hanging herself, she wouldn't be able to escape a predator such as a dog.
Thanks Kim. That may be what I do. Phil
I have a cat who loves to be outdoors. I have a neighbor who says my cat gets on his ... would want the new owner to allow her outside, or I haven't solved the problem. Thanks for any help offered.

Make her a safe outdoor enclosure. A couple of treated 2x4s and some hardware cloth and she's got a place she can sit and stare at the birds and breathe the fresh air.
I have a cat who loves to be outdoors. I ... I haven't solved the problem. Thanks for any help offered.

Make her a safe outdoor enclosure. A couple of treated 2x4s and some hardware cloth and she's got a place she can sit and stare at the birds and breathe the fresh air.

You could also offer to buy cat repellent for the neighbour and offer to apply it liberally to his property, then both of you monitor the situation to see if it helps.
I have a cat who loves to be outdoors. I have a neighbor who says my cat gets on his ... cats in the neighborhood and that the neighbor has a garage, but chooses not to park his truck in it.

He shouldn't have to. It's your cat, and you're responsible for keeping her on your property. He shouldn't have to worry about strange cats (or dogs) coming onto his property and ruining his things, now, should he? The fact that other neighbors are irresponsible with their cats in not a valid reason for you being that way with yours.
I bet you'd be pretty peeved if someone was letting their dog run loose and it came over onto your property and hurt (or even just harassed) your cat.

Your neighbor might want to consider a motion activated sprinkler to keep roaming cats off his property.
If I keep the cat in, she gets very antsy and frustrated. This one neighbor is the only plaintiff. I've thought of some solutions:

I'd keep her in, but if she loves to go out, there are other things you can do for her.
enclosed run in the yard (don't leave her out there if you're not home) leash train her and take her for walks (my cat loves this) enclosure that is outside window (I've seen this - if the window is on the first floor, the enclosure sits on a pedastal that brings it to window level, so the cat can get outside into it from the window at will) if you are good with building things and have the room and desire to do so, you can get really elaborate and build an enclosed ramp from a window to an outdoor enclosure so she can go in and out as she chooses.

Cats adjust to pretty much anything over time. In my opinion, it is crueler to rehome her than to teach her to stay in more. I suppose that depends on how much she loves you and your family, but most of us are very attached to our cats - and they are attached to us. It takes them a lot longer to adjust to a whole new family and environment than to adjust to staying in more.

Anyway, my 5 cents, FWIW.

~kaeli~
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Thanks to all of you for the responses. I love the kitty too much to let her go. If all else fails, I'll keep her in.
Somebody at work suggested getting one of those collar-activated electric fences and stapling it to the top of my fence in the backyard. If it deters her from climbing the fence, she would stay in the back yard.

What do you guys think? Have you heard of such a thing working for cats? Phil
Thanks to all of you for the responses. I love the kitty too much to let her go. If all ... in the back yard. What do you guys think? Have you heard of such a thing working for cats? Phil

My thoughts...
1. These things deliver shocks when a pet crosses (or nears) the boundary,thus preventing them from coming home if they do manage to get out. In the heat of a chase, it happens.
2. They can seriously *** up a dog if the dog isn't trained properly. Thedog ends up associating the pain with the wrong behavior (such as moving north or walking with their head up - whatever they were doing at the precise moment they got a shock) or just with the yard in general rather than the boundry.
I can't imagine trying to train the cat, who won't understand. I can easily see the cat getting the shock, getting righteously frightened, and cowering under the bed for 2 days. Training involves shocking the animal and has to be done in regimented steps so the animal understands why it is being shocked. Cats don't take well to this. Actually, neither do dogs, but we do it to them anyway.
3. I have yet to see a collar small enough for a cat for these products. Thecollar has a somewhat heavy transmitter on it. If the collar comes off, you lose the effect. The collar is what shocks the animal. Some dogs are smart enough to know that and get the collar off. Cats aren't stupid.
4. If you love your pet, why would you want to train it using pain?

If you have a fully fenced yard, there is a product you can attach to the top of the fence that makes it difficult to climb (it's rounded, smooth, and very hard to get traction on). Search the archives, as I know it's been posted. Look at rec.pets.cats.health+behav, too.

~kaeli~
User: The word computer professionals use when they mean 'idiot'.
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Thanks to all of you for the responses. I love the kitty too much to let her go. If all ... in the back yard. What do you guys think? Have you heard of such a thing working for cats? Phil

I don't think the collar-activated electric fences would work with a cat. Here are links to two sites with ideas to "cat-proof" your existing fence. I also have some links for mesh fencing, in case part of your yard is not fenced.
Design for do-it-yourself barrier to mount on top of fence (to keep cats in): http://www.lisaviolet.com/cathouse/backyard.html

KittyKlips - addition to existing wood fence to prevent cats from climbing in): http://kittyklips.com/details.htm
Note: You will also need to secure the other side of the fence to prevent other cats from entering. Otherwise, your neighbors' cats could enter your yard but then be trapped there.
MaryL
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