Had to leave the house early this morning 'cause hubby needed a drive to work. Then the kidlets and I went to the gym and then tried to get some christmas shopping done, so it was about 3:30pm before I was home again.

When Macula met us at the front door she was limping a bit, favouring her left hind leg. She puts some weight on it but not the full amount, and when she sits she looks as if she's leaning a little to the right (ie. keeping weight of the sore side). I phoned the dogwalker and she said Macula had been like this when she came this morning: it hadn't kept her from running but she wasn't "quite as perky" as she usually was.

I phoned the vet, but he had left for the day, so the earliest I could get an appointment was tomorrow am @ 9:30. Hence my question: what (if anything) should I do in the meantime?
I've run my hand over the leg and Macula didn't flinch, and what ever it is isn't keeping her from going outside or up and down stairs she just hobbles a little.
How worried should I be?
Marie
Meet Macula at http://members.rogers.com/mmcw/
Meet the Kidlets at
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When Macula met us at the front door she was limping a bit, favouring her left hind leg. She puts ... get an appointment was tomorrow am @ 9:30. Hence my question: what (if anything) should I do in the meantime?

I would do nothing for right now. If you knew of an event that would explain it then I might be inclined to suggest a buffered aspirin. But medication can mask symptoms and if you really haven't any idea what the cause is then its usually better to just wait.
I've run my hand over the leg and Macula didn't flinch, and what ever it is isn't keeping her from going outside or up and down stairs she just hobbles a little. How worried should I be?

Nothing you said makes me worry much.
Did you check between her toes? I know Zelda gets burrs caught in her paws sometimes.
Had to leave the house early this morning 'cause hubby needed a drive to work. Then the kidlets and I ... itis isn't keeping her from going outside or up and down stairs she justhobbles a little. How worried should I be?

Nothing you can do and no point in worrying to be honest. Pebbles, my 9yo Min. Dachshund, has done this more times than I can count now. Only once (the most recent) did it turn out to be serious which was an ACL tear. The other times it was either a sprain or pulled muscle because nothing showed on x-rays or palpation. The blown knee wasn't pleasant, primarily due to cost and my fear of putting her under anesthesia at her age, but it was all fine in the end. Sometimes limps work themselves out in a day, sometimes it takes a little longer. My vet lets me keep a supply of *** on hand for the times she does this. If there's no improvement after a few days of meds then she goes in for x-rays.

Tara
Hi Marie -
(Disclaimer: I'm no vet Emotion: smile - Looking at your site with the pictures of your cutie, it looks to me like she's pretty young. That probably rules out any arthritic or knee problems, so you probably shouldn't be too worried. The most likely culprits are a sprain or something stuck in a paw, possibly an allergic reaction to something she stepped in, but the latter is highly unlikely if there is no swelling.

Obviously, you are worried enough to get her to the vet first thing tomorrow, or I'd be telling to you to be more worried, but since she's not crying out and it sounds like she's limping rather than trying to carry the leg far off the ground or at odd angles, I'd personally bet on a sprain or twisted ankle. With some good vet lovin' she'll probably be just fine in a week Emotion: smile
HtH, and kisses to Macula (great name, btw!) Emotion: smile
katie
K8K9 Dog Training
http://www.katiek9.com
I've run my hand over the leg and Macula didn't flinch, and what ever it is isn't keeping her from going outside or up and down stairs she just hobbles a little. How worried should I be?

Marie, I hope you have your answer by now and the answer is that you don't have anything to be worried about. Anyway, thought I'd relate Izzy's story, in case it makes you feel any better.

Izzy's mom called me a couple of days back to tell me that she had been holding up her leg on the side where she crashed into a chest (she was hanging onto and swinging from a kong in Steve's hand, lost her grip and crashed - first time ever), and the following day, she was limping, not playing, and generally looking and acting all pathetic, although she had started to put a little weight on it again.In order to relieve her pain, Marcy gave her Aleve and I said that she should call the doctor about the leg, but I'd be more concerned about the pain meds, since I wasn't sure if it was okay to do that. Turns out, Aleve can cause kidney failure in dogs, and hearing that, Marcy totally freaked out (Oh my god, I'm a horrible person. I poisoned my dog!) and asked Steve to come home so he could look through the trash can to find her poop and check to make sure that it wasn't overly dark (indicating internal bleeding).

As soon as Steve gets home, Izzy picks up a toy, runs downstairs, tail wagging full speed. She sure knew how to play up the 'Woe is me!' angle, and managed to get all sorts of extra pets and even a few treats out of suckermom.
They came over on a play date yesterday, we walked the two dogs at a nearby park, and you sure couldn't tell this was a dog who was acting like she was half way to being dead not even 24 hours before.

Suja
out, Aleve can cause kidney failure in dogs, and hearing that, Marcy totally freaked out (Oh my god, I'm a ... is me!' angle, and managed to get all sorts of extra pets and even a few treats out of suckermom.

If I had been thinking on my toes, I would have mentioned this as well. It's an excellent point, Suja. Many, many household medications can cause serious problems in both dogs and cats, especially those designed for pain relief. Benadryl and most antibiotics, as well as antidepressants, are the same for both people and dogs, but even those can have different effect in an animal's body and should never be administered without a vet's prescription.

Personally, I actually always keep some pet-friendly pain relievers around the house (if you decide to do this, make sure you replace them yearly! Pills can break down quite quickly) in case of any accidents. Happily I have not had to use them. I also keep a length of plastic tubing in case of bloat, so I can get some relief to the dog while en route to the emergency ward, which I have also happily never had to use. But better safe than sorry, and should one of my pets have an emergency I want to be prepared Emotion: smile
I hope Macula is doing well - let us know how the vet visit went!

Katie
K8K9 Dog Training
http://www.katiek9.com
especially those designed for pain relief. Benadryl and most antibiotics, as well as antidepressants, are the same for both people and dogs,

I think that's part of the problem. People get so used to the vets telling them that it's okay to give Aspirin or Pepto or other human meds that they sometimes assume that all the human OTC meds are okay for other animals.
Suja
especially those designed for pain relief. Benadryl and most antibiotics, as well as antidepressants, are the same for both people and dogs,

I think that's part of the problem. People get so used to the vets telling them that it's okay to give Aspirin or Pepto or other human meds that they sometimes assume that all the human OTC meds are okay for other animals. Suja

That's another good point. It's easy to forget how different our physiologies are from dogs'. A great example of that is that amitriptyline, which is a fairly old-school antidepressant for humans (and dogs), can also help to alleviate incontinence in older spayed female dogs, because in dogs - and not at all in humans - the chemical changes produced by the medication also cause various muscles (that can be weakened by lower levels of estrogen) in the urogenital system to become stronger.
Also, aspirin that's not buffered actually can be harmful to animals, even in smaller doses. It can also be harmful to people if ingested in sufficient quantity (buffered or not) - a lot of young people that have attempted suicide using aspirin or ibuprofen have suffered significant kidney damage as a result.
Short version: all medications should only ever be administered with the advice of a medical professional - even if you're a human! Emotion: smile

katie
K8K9 Dog Training
http://www.katiek9.com
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