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1. Manage so that the chance of the unwanted behavior never arises, or

This would be the use of extinction which can work on most dogs but not 100%.

Actually I meant avoidance rather than extinction - like making the dog live outside 100% instead of housetraining.
Ii hope you are not lumping ALL positive trainers into this category because not all are like that.

Of course not. In fact I count myself as a positive trainer. It's not just a matter of lack of physical corrections - most good trainers are really positive because they've learned that confrontation is the very last approach of choice.
Lynn K.
Actually I meant avoidance rather than extinction - like making the dog live outside 100% instead of housetraining.

Okay...I see what your saying there...definitely a lack of training going on.
Of course not. In fact I count myself as a positive trainer. It's not just a matter of lack of physical corrections - most good trainers are really positive because they've learned that confrontation is the very last approach of choice.

I like that definition...I also liked Amy's analogy of the wedding cake.

I will have to keep my eyes open for these Pure Positives...don't think there are any in my area but there are a lot of trainers who utilize bribery instead of reward and that really gets to me.
B
I will have to keep my eyes open for these Pure Positives...don't think there are any in my area

I bet there are, although you may not have anybody making all or part of their living with the claim.
I can just about guarantee you that if you took a survey of dog owners in your area, you could find those who will identify themselves as "positive trainers", meaning "*I* never use Evil Punishment". Most of the ones I've met have a distinct tendency to be holier than thou, and ALL of the ones I've met who have decently trained dogs have "easy" breeds with soft temperaments.
Yes, strictly speaking, you're right. But I colloquially refer to both humans and dogs in my classes as my "students."

why confuse the issue? also, why give your students the idea that you are their dogs' trainer?

It's a pretty big leap in logic to go from calling those who attend my classes "students" to convincing the humans that I am training their dogs in one hour a week.
They also refer to me as "Fido's trainer." I don't feel the need to stop them and give them a lecture about who is actually training the dog. I think they get that after just one class with me. And if they're not sure, the homework sheets probably go a long way in making it clear who needs to do the work.

Plus, in the first class I tell them not to compare their dogs' progress to other dogs in the class. I make it clear that the rate of learning has very little to do with the dog, and a lot to do with how much time they are willing to dedicate to training.
And when they come to thank me for "all I did for their dog," I remind them that I didn't do it, they did. I just showed them how.

I don't think I'm going to cause any major misconceptions if I happen to call a dog in my class a "student."
Canine Action Dog Trainer
http://www.canineaction.com
My Kids, My Students, My Life:
http://hometown.aol.com/dfrntdrums/myhomepage/index.html
Maybe you are reading this wrong. Try this: The only way for the humans to get Leah's attention is to sit there and let her play with their dogs herself. See?

Paula
A Raggedy Ann in a Barbie world.
Ahhh, now I get it! ;-)
Debbie