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I actually think there is no such thing as PP. That choosing to ignore a behavior is, in itself, a correction. A

I agree. A certain other person refuses to see it that way, however. It is all about reward training, so the lack of a reward couldn't possibly be a correction, could it?
I actually almost never use the word no because it's too global.

I tend not to use No with the dogs either, opting to use 'Uh-Uh', 'I don't think so' and 'Just what the hell do you think you're doing'. They aren't confused by conversational use of the word, though.

Suja
I haven't found that my dogs are confused by things like "Do you no the way to San Jose?" or even by a conversational "no."

I've a friend who has trained his dogs to high levels in a lot of stuff. While I respect his opinions, I disagree with his disagreement of my "OK" as a release word. Dogs, I'm pretty sure, can reasonably discern context.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
I've a friend who has trained his dogs to high levels in a lot of stuff. While I respect his opinions, I disagree with his disagreement of my "OK" as a release word. Dogs, I'm pretty sure, can reasonably discern context.

Actually, one of the things we read over and over and over again (because it's true) is that dogs are extremely sensitive to context.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

Republicans told me that government spending would explode if I voted for Al Gore, and they were right.
(Email Removed) (Melinda Shore) said in
I've a friend who has trained his dogs to high ... release word. Dogs, I'm pretty sure, can reasonably discern context.

Actually, one of the things we read over and over and over again (because it's true) is that dogs are extremely sensitive to context.

Yes.

Matt. Rocky's a Dog.
()
Like pretty much everything else, it depends how you use it.

Like a strap-on, for example?

Handsome Jack Morrison
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()

Like pretty much everything else, it depends how you use it.

Like a strap-on, for example?


Stereotype much?
Mustang Sally
Rule of thumb - if you want a good or near-perfect recall, NEVER call your dog to you for something unpleasant. Go get him. Keep in mind that what gets rewarded gets repeated and what gets punished gets extinguished.

I have been doing this now for a few days, since reading all the posts recommending it and he is doing well with a near perfect recall.
You can teach your dog a "kennel" command. It's funny, but mine don't like to be led into their crates, but if I say "Kennel!" they'll run right in.

So, how do I make sure he listens to me ... have to go back to square one and start over?

You have to go through the proofing process. You don't have to start over. But if you're looking for a ... for ignoring you because he got to do what he wanted. You have to make him do what you want.

Ok, I will try a long line so that he has to listen even with distractions.

sounds good, I'll give it a try.
Or find a good e-collar trainer and use that. I do long line work first, then I introduce the e-collar ... gotten since I started using the e-collar have been so incredible that I'd hesitate to proof off-leash recalls without one.

Also, in the future, I plan to get some agility ... I need to reach that 100% before trying agility stuff?

If you wait for 100%, you'll never do agility. But it helps to have your basic obedience down first.

that's reassuring, I wanted to do some agility stuff with him since I got him at 8 weeks old and I never could afford the equipment. Now I will soon be able to so I am glad he will be able to do it even if he's not at 100%.
If it matters, the agility stuff would just be for ... or anything like that. Thanks for any help and advice.

My advice is - take him to an obedience class. It's great for distraction proofing. Then take him to a ... your dog with the equipment and helping you to set jumps and obstacles at the correct height to avoid injury.

I am trying to find a class around here for agility but it is proving to be harder than I thought. I am not giving up any time soon though!
Hope this helps!

Yes, it does, thanks bunches!
I actually almost never use the word no because it's ... doesn't understand why it's bad or how to fix it.

Like pretty much everything else, it depends how you use it. My dogs understand "NO!" to mean "stop it right now," for whatever value of "it" is operative at that moment.

Maui understands "no" in basically the same way. To him it means "stop whatever I am doing and look at Momma"
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Ok, so its not just my dog? Good to know. ... try to get as close to 100% as I can.

Recall reliability is directly proportionate to how much time and effort you* put into training for it, how intelligent *you* are about exposing him to certain situations off leash, and how observant *you are when he is.

I'm a lazy trainer yet my dogs have fantastic recalls. In fact last week, while on our dawn run, we surprised 5 deer who took off with Lucy & Pablo in hot pursuit. Yet when I called them, they spun around and came flying back. Dang, it was impressive. My method of training spectacular recalls? The secret is to start with a collie - sticking around with me is very high on their daily to-do list. The second is to praise (and an occasional treat doesn't hurt) them when they come back - getting my approval is also on a collie's daily to-do list.
OK so I don't have any useful advice on teaching recalls to a non-collie but I just had to brag (or is it a gloat?) about last weeks run-in with the deer. Even Lucy, who is the Anti-Lassie, was a very very VERY good girl.

Chris and her smoothies
Pablo & Lucy
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