I saw something yesterday that has bothered me since.

As I walked across the parking lot of a store, a old male Gorgi (sp?) crossed my path. His back end was suspended in a complicated looking apparatus with wheels and slings, requiring him to use his front legs for locomotion. I noticed his back legs were pumping away as he moved, and he left a trail of urine. His owner appeared with another Gorgi who was healthy. The two-wheeled dog appeared to be exerting himself to move.

Unable to resist, I asked the woman what was going on. (I hoped to learn that he was simply recovering from a fracture.) She answered that a "nerve condition" prevented him from using his back legs. I could tell that she was wary and awaiting more questions. I simply nodded and smiled and went on my way.
SO is this ethical-? Is it humane-? I am not a big fancier of canines, but cannot stand cruelty to 'em. Is this practice common-? Should the woman euthanize the poor critter-? I would appreciate any thoughts & wisdom.
Cheers
Buzzy
in thread "Buzzy" (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
I saw something yesterday that has bothered me since. As I walked across the parking lot of a store, a ... Is this practice common-? Should the woman euthanize the poor critter-? I would appreciate any thoughts & wisdom. Cheers Buzzy

I think thats between the owner and the dog. If she's willing to accomodate him, and he's not in pain, what difference does it make?
in thread

If she's willing to accomodate
him, and he's not in pain, what difference does it make?

Indeed, that is the crucial question. I have known folks we all have who simply couldn't face euthanizing a critically ill pet. It's a tough decision.
I couldn't devine the dog's comfort level, and I am confident the owner is trying to enable his locomotion in a way that does not cause pain. I have only shared my (53 years of) life with a couple of dogs thus far, but I was always moved by their fierce loyalty and willingness to please. The relationship of a human and his / her dog is a private matter.

So, as the little Gorgi plodded along, I hoped he was as pain-free as possible. Who knows-? He may be as contented as his able-bodied companion. I hope so.
Thanks for the input.
Buzzy
in thread "Buzzy" (Email Removed) whittled the following words:

Let me put it this way. I had a dog that was so special to me that nothing in the world was more important than him. I never wanted him in pain. But I knew he endured some measure of pain, and gave him medications to control it. The day i realized that his days were never again going to have the quality of the very moment he was experiencing, I decided to put him down. Only on necropsy, did I discover he was experiencing much more pain than he ever let on that he was experiencing.
about an hour. I had an appointment to put him down in an hour.

One woman gasped, and said. If you don't want that dog.. I DO!! DON'T put him to sleep because he's old!
Honey, if you knew how wrenching it was to put this dog down. I had timed his medications so his last two hours of his life would be the BEST. The medications to control his pain were so strong that they made him sleep 22 hours a day. That's not a life. But 2 hours before he took his next meds.. he was the BEST. In fact, he looked so good, it seemed a sin to put him down. He was in that window at that moment. I wanted out final two hours together to be the best.
It isn't that I don't want this dog. I just don't want this dog to be in the pain he's in. You don't see his pain, but it's there. What they saw was "THIS" http://members.ezsg.com/(Email Removed)/ This is the last picture that he took. This is not the look of a dog in pain.
Owners have a handle on pain and what their dog is experiencing. The onlookers had no idea. They would NEVER have put that dog down that day. (until 2 hours later when the meds wore off)
But you witnessed only a fleeting moment of that dog's day. It may be much better. It may be much worse. Obviously that dog was very loved. I had a dachsie in a wheel chair once, and it was temporary until a chiropracter restored her mobility. She lived a quality 8 years after that.