We have had a doogie door with our Manchester for most of the year we've had him. We were interested in adopting a companion, but he rescue that has what looks like an ideal companion refuses to allow anyone to adopt who has/uses a doggie door. I have not been able to get a clear reason why.
Why do some people believe doggy doors are bad for dogs?

Ken
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Why do some people believe doggy doors are bad for dogs?

Dog doors aren't bad. The issue I've seen discussed most often concerns people whose dogs have unsupervised access to the yard..meaning when no one is home. Dogs can jump fences, get stolen, bark and become nuisances, get into things they shouldn't, etc when no one is home and available to supervise.
If you confine your dog to the house when you're away from home then I really don't see why a rescue would have a problem with that outside of the probability that they'd feel they can't verify it. If you allow your dog access to the outside when you're not home then that's probably the reason they turned you down.
I've recently been seriously considering a dog door. My dogs wouldn't be able to use it when I'm not home nor at night but it would allow them to come and go all they want when I'm home.

Tara
Why do some people believe doggy doors are bad for dogs?

If you allow your dog access to the outside when you're not home then that's probably the reason they turned you down.

No. It's stated in their policy. If you have a doggy door you cannot adopt from them, period.
Ken
If you allow your dog access to the outside when you're not home then that's probably the reason they turned you down.

No. It's stated in their policy. If you have a doggy door you cannot adopt from them, period.

As I offered in another part of my post the reasoning is likely that they can't verify that people really don't allow their dogs access to dog doors when unsupervised. Therefore a blanket policy is in place as alot of people with dog doors install them so their dogs can go out when no one is home. I may be wrong but that's my hunch. You might want to look at a different rescue.

Tara
No. It's stated in their policy. If you have a doggy door you cannot adopt from them, period.

As I offered in another part of my post the reasoning is likely that they can't verify that people really ... one is home. I may be wrong but that's my hunch. You might want to look at a different rescue.

Yes. Don't feel too bad about this - rescue organizations are like anything else: there are good ones, and clueless ones, and everything in between.
We had a case here in Dallas recently where a cocker who was let out into the back yard for a few minutes escaped, and was turned into the shelter within hours. The rescue who had adopted her out was somehow notified before the owner, and they responded by taking the dog back; the justification being that the fact that the dog had escaped was de facto proof that the owner was irresponsible.

The worst part of it was that they went literally weeks without notifying the owner, despite her phone calls to them, their know- ledge that she had been constantly canvassing the neighborhood; putting up flyers, etc. She found out from a shelter worker what had happened, and ended up having to take the rescue to court to get her dog back.

Mark Shaw (And Baron) moc TOD liamg TA wahsnm == "Dogs feel very strongly that they should always go with you in the car, in case the need should arise for them to bark violently at nothing right in your ear." -Dave Barry
Why do some people believe doggy doors are bad for dogs?

Because dogs using them means dogs without supervision outdoors, and free access when nobody's home. Of course, that's not always the case either. I've had dog doors which were only used when I gave access, as a "weather block" of sorts, not having to open the door to outside. Still, I understand the rescue's concern that the dog will have free access when nobody is home, and inadequate supervision when you are.

Some people use them instead of really housebreaking a dog. They can be handy once a dog is housebroken though, but I also like to know the "bathroom" habits of my dogs - they're a big indicator of health.

Janet Boss
www.bestfriendsdogobedience.com
As I offered in another part of my post the ... hunch. You might want to look at a different rescue.

Yes. Don't feel too bad about this - rescue organizations are like anything else: there are good ones, and clueless ones, and everything in between.

True enough, but I don't think that a policy against dog doors makes a rescue group bad or clueless. I don't like them myself, though we don't have a blanket policy.
Mustang Sally
True enough, but I don't think that a policy against dog doors makes a rescue group bad or clueless. I don't like them myself, though we don't have a blanket policy.

Point is that the rescue the OP is dealing with apparently has a "dog door

automatic disqualification" policy, which in my opinion is overly simplistic. They (again IMO) should look at other factors as well, such as how the dog door is used and the actual level of supervision the dogs have.
I don't think there's anything intrinsically wrong with rigid policy, mind you - if it means no agreement is possible between two parties, so be it. Faced with the same issue myself, I'd just move on.

Mark Shaw (And Baron) moc TOD liamg TA wahsnm

"Man is a dog's idea of what God should be." -Holbrook Jackson
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