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it seems to me dogs enjoy the high traffic areas.

Mine don't. For lying down, they prefer out-of-the way, secure places where they won't get stepped on. When they do choose to lie in a human pathway, it's because there's a breeze there - and they have no problem with being asked to get up if a human needs to get by.
Maybe there just isn't a being underfoot problem in the dog world. When they're in a pack it's common to jostle and be jostled. Doesn't it reinforce the feeling that they're a member in good standing?

It doesn't sound like you have much actual experience with dogs in packs. First, it's not "common to jostle and be jostled"; dogs who bump into other dogs are considered rude, and usually get told off by the bumpee. Second, it IS common for dogs to defer to each other's space. Making physical contact with each other is normal, but not "jostling" or impeding the other's path, unless they lack respect.

And in case you're wondering, yes, I have a great deal of first-hand, real-life knowlege of dogs in packs, and not just living with my own pack of three.
If nothing else, you REALLY need to teach your dog not to rush through the door - that's extremely dangerous behaviour.
And since I've taught literally several dozen dogs -most of them full-grown and not mine - to wait for permission to go through doors in just a few short sessions, I'm quite sure it would be possible for you to teach your dog not to.
Oh, and don't tell me the dog's too large for you to try it with - I'm 4'
11 3/4", weigh under 105, and have taught it to dogs weighing 80 lbs andmore.
Hah. Do dogs really understand manners?

Yes, they most certainly do, and they will correct other dogs who display bad ones.
Think how they act. When they want something, they elbow to the front. They push past.

Mine don't. And they don't tolerate the behaviour from other dogs, either.
I've never seen anything comparable to an "pardon me" from a dog,

Then you've not spent very much time watching dogs interact with each other.
so isn't it just more appropriate to nudge them?

It's not inappropriate to nudge them, but it's useful to also teach them to respond to a verbal command. If I have an armful of laundry or am carrying heavy groceries, it's easier all round for me to say "Excuse me" or "Move" and have the dogs listen that it is for me to attempt to nudge them. Generally, though, they get out of the way without being asked.
He limps at times, but that might all be an act because he moves like the wind when he sees a squirrel.

Dogs rarely put on an act of being in pain. More likely, the dog has CHD, arthritis, or both, and should be examined by a vet.
And yes, when we were required to memorize the preamble to the constitution in High School Government class

Which probably happened quite recently, right?

Um, '81 maybe? Why do you ask?
Bizby
This has to be one of the main benefits of having two dogs.

Yep. Having older trained dogs was certainly a significant contributing factor to my ability to raise an off-leash Jack Russell.

Same here. The BCs helped trail train my JRT. He generally prefers to stay close to them when off lead, and if he lags too far behind checking out a burrow or something, one of them circles back and brings him along.

Kathleen
Pray tell how?
Keep in mind, I have a human woman here and any time I try to do any training, it's lectured about doing it wrong. I never do anything right. It's a lot like this newgroup which is also full of women.
I always thought that dogs in a pack developed an order. Through fighting they'd pick who was the first dog, the second and so forth and then they'd feed depending on who was first. And anytime I see animals in a bunch, they're always knocking into each other. My dog knocks into me all the time. It's rough play. I think you're seeing things when you see manners in dogs.
I always thought that dogs in a pack developed an order. Through fighting they'd pick who was the first dog, the second and so forth and then they'd feed depending on who was first.

Yep. You don't have any real life experience of dogs in packs. First, although there is heirarchy in a pack, it's not a matter of a simple 1-2-3 progression like that. It's fluid, with different individuals being dominant in certain situations, and with dogs often being equals. Second, dominance and leadership are neither determined nor expressed by fighting, except in rare instances.
My dog knocks into me all the time. It's rough play.

It may be "rough play", but it's more likely a matter of him expressing disrespect for you.
Some dogs like to play like that with each other, which is fine if both dogs like it, but it's NOT appropriate for dogs to do it to humans, nor to other dogs who don't like that style of play - which many don't.
in thread "Sionnach" (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
Yep. You don't have any real life experience of dogs in packs. First, although there is heirarchy in a pack, ... other dogs, to a dog that isn't naturally an alpha dog. Simply because the other dogs aren't naturally leaders either.

This happened to Reka when Danny died. It took nearly 8 or 9 months before things settled in. A leaderless pack is a very sad thing to see.