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Probably because it makes him feel like the alpha male to have you step over or around him. Once he's in charge, he won't do anything you want him to do.

that's a crock. i understand that it's potentially dangerous to step over lying dogs, as they might stand up and knock you over. but, i do it all the time and neither of my dogs seems to have any trouble figuring out that they are not the boss of me.
while i think it's important to understand how pack structure works, i think the alpha-schmalpha crap has done more harm than good.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

O! for a muse of fire, that would ascend the brightest heaven of invention.
William Shakespeare
Hah. Do dogs really understand manners? Think how they act. When they want something, they elbow to the front. They push past. I've never seen anything comparable to an "pardon me" from a dog, so isn't it just more appropriate to nudge them?
I do step over him. It's a matter of expediency and I spoil him. He also has a little bit of a pain problem in getting up. He limps at times, but that might all be an act because he moves like the wind when he sees a squirrel.
Probably because it makes him feel like the alpha male to have you step over or around him. Once he's in charge, he won't do anything you want him to do.

Where'd you learn that?

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

43% of all private-sector jobs created in the US
from 2001 to April 2005 are housing-related
Yielding to humans physical space is a good thing.

I agree, but I do always say "Excuse me, hon" first. Zoe knows that this means "get out of the way" and Queenie is learning it, sort of. Personal space issues are not her forte.

I just tell them MOVE. I don't have a single 100# dog but I have one 60# and one 65#, who tend to ball up in a swirling wad of dobermanness that means 125# of legs heads and bodies. I have a tiny house. If they don't move I just keep coming and they get shoved.
Hah. Do dogs really understand manners?

sure they do. dogs have their own set of acceptable and unacceptable behaviors. they may not coincide with human manners, but they do exist.
Think how they act. When they want something, they elbow to the front. They push past.

not in my house. left to their own devices, the girldog gets what she wants and the boydog waits patiently and long sufferingly for his turn.
I've never seen anything comparable to an "pardon me" from a dog, so isn't it just more appropriate to nudge them?

depending on the circumstances, a nudge from the boydog will likely get him snarked at by the girldog. she's an insufferably bossy ***.
I do step over him. It's a matter of expediency and I spoil him. He also has a little bit ... at times, but that might all be an act because he moves like the wind when he sees a squirrel.

my male is getting on in age and is starting to show some discomfort from arthritis. he's often stiff and awkward when getting up from a nap. but(!), he still critters like a possessed demon dog.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

You are responsible, forever, for what you have tamed. You are responsible for your rose.
Antoine de Saint-Exupery
I just tell them MOVE. I don't have a single 100# dog but I have one 60# and one 65#, ... heads and bodies. I have a tiny house. If they don't move I just keep coming and they get shoved.

I do that (or did that, they've learned not to block my path), while saying "outofmyway, outofmyway, outofmyway" over and over again.

Melinda Shore - Software longa, hardware brevis - (Email Removed)

43% of all private-sector jobs created in the US
from 2001 to April 2005 are housing-related
. She also has a tendency to crash into us when running by, and when walking on the leash she lurches in front of me periodically and it's hard to avoid stepping on her paw. Sometimes I think we should rename her Lurch.

Well Cala does the near-miss-drive-by and occasionally doesn't time it right she thinks it's a huge game. She also uses me as a ricochet board on the recall, which I'm breaking her of slowly but surely.
What I'd like is for him to stay away from certain spots that are choke points. There are places he can hang around where he isn't a nuisance, but it seems to me dogs enjoy the high traffic areas. Maybe being underfoot makes them feel like they exist. Maybe there just isn't a being underfoot problem in the dog world. When they're in a pack it's common to jostle and be jostled. Doesn't it reinforce the feeling that they're a member in good standing?
Rescue Friday came to me at 7 months old, but he bonded immediately to 4 YO Rocky, so even though I'd changed his name, all I had to do was call for Rocky and Friday would follow in his wake.

That went an awfully long way toward giving Puppy Storm her early recall: she learned our whistle calls because she'd come in behind our older dog, usually still attached to the poor girl's ear.
Still, there's nothing like a long line and lots of repetition and praise in a safe place to teach the lesson... and I know I have it relatively easy with sporting dogs. I truly respect those who can get a reliable recall on the more independent breeds.

Kate
and Storm and The Puppy to be Named Later, the FCR duo
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