1 4 5 6  8 9 10 11
@panix2.panix.com:
I just tell them MOVE. I don't have a single ... don't move I just keep coming and they get shoved.

I do that (or did that, they've learned not to block my path), while saying "outofmyway, outofmyway, outofmyway" over and over again.

I do use "scoot scoot SCOOT!!!" for those special times they are tripping me up on the stairs.

Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow
& Queenie the black gold retriever
& Rosalie the calico
Hah. Do dogs really understand manners?

Are they born understanding manners? No. Can they be taught to understand what is and isn't appropriate behavior? Most certainly.

My dog Patience is a good illustration of this. Not only does she understand what behavior I expect from her, she quickly extrapolated from this to how other dogs should behave. She showed an inclination to go discipline them when they got out of line (i.e. jumping on people, not coming when called and so on). This phenomenon is common enough that it has a name: she was trying to be the Fun Police. So part of her manners training involved teaching her that it wasn't her job to enforce the rules, that this was a matter for the humans involved to deal with.
Think how they act. When they want something, they elbow to the front. They push past.

They will if they are allowed to. But it's quite easy to teach them not to do that.
I've never seen anything comparable to an "pardon me" from a dog

My house, my rules. My dogs are not allowed to push past me, so there's no need for a "pardon me," is there? Rather, they look to me for permission, which is either granted or not depending on the situation. That might sound draconian, but having rules like this is actually a matter of safety. For instance, when I go to let the dogs out of the car, they must wait until they're given permission. Why? Well, I have to have a chance to put a leash on them. So it's open door, put leash on, release. It would be absolutely unacceptable to allow them to simply push past me in that situation, "pardon me" or no.
JFWIW,
Dianne
I don't know if Janet got the memo, but Queenie certainly didn't. Although she's an eeevil black dog rather than a full Golden Retriever.

eeevil is a mindset. at least, that's what pan and harriet say.
She also has no interest in retrieving anything, or in swimming.

Queenie is a Boxer x Golden!

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

You can owe nothing, if you give back its light to the sun. Antonio Porchia
Your dog probably weighs 20 pounds.
I don't know if Janet got the memo, but Queenie certainly didn't. Although she's an eeevil black dog rather than a full Golden Retriever.

eeevil is a mindset. at least, that's what pan and harriet say.

A mindset, and a way of life! That little cockerchow is pure eeevil as well.
She also has no interest in retrieving anything, or in swimming.

Queenie is a Boxer x Golden!

She does have her own ideas about things. And although she doesn't sass me, she does sass Zoe when Zoe doesn't want to play. Then Zoe just looks at her, smiling, as if she is the most amusing thing on earth.

Catherine
& Zoe the cockerchow
& Queenie the black gold retriever
& Rosalie the calico
You must run one of those tough love camps. HAH! I'd love to see your dogs all lining up on command like a troop of soldiers.

You know, your top posting makes it difficult for people to reply to you and keep it in context.
My dogs don't line up on command well they can but I don't demand it before I go out the door. The door rule is very simple. Stay out of my way, and don't go out the door. Besides, I adore my dogs and they adore me. Just like kids, dogs like structure. They are most comfortable and happy when they are given concrete parameters to work in. Of course the rules themselves must be fair, but what isn't fair is getting mad at the dog for doing something you allow him to do. That creates a confused and unhappy pet.
I've gotta say that it's a rare day to run into somebody so completely and utterly lazy.

A card carrying member of the "I want to complain about it but I will reject all advice given because I might actually have to get off my butt and do something" group. Textbook example of why giving out great advice can be incredibly frustrating.
Textbook example of why giving out great advice can be incredibly frustrating.

but, hey, if we all talked sweetly to this misogynistic asstrumpet, he'd surely have an epiphany.

shelly
http://home.bluemarble.net/~scouvrette>> http://cat-sidh.blogspot.com

It's when the parents are cannibals that the kids turn out like this. Melora (Rasputina)
Your dog probably weighs 20 pounds.

Sorry, your ESP is failing you very badly today . Here's a picture of her: . She's the one on the right :-). As you can see, other dogs are not the only thing she likes to boss around. And she's the smallest dog of her breed I've ever had - my first one was half again her size.
And that's precisely why it's so important for my dogs to be well-mannered and listen to me; back when I lived in the city and had four dogs her size I couldn't afford to have them take off after a cat while I was walking them, just as one example. Like I said, it's a matter of safety.

JFWIW,
Dianne
Show more