Okay, put your eyeballs back in your head. You are not seeing things. I am actually starting a legitimate discussion.
Considering how long it's been since wild caught birds have been imported in mass quantities and that most birds do die before their time, wild caught birds are becoming a dieing breed. I was just wondering how many of you people still have a wild caught pet bird or two or three in your flock. Also what species do you have and do you see any real difference between the wild caught birds as pets after all these years and those that had been handfed?I have a wild caught blue crowned conure that I bought in '92. He's an ornery old cuss, but he does seem to trust me more than most of my handfeds do. Feet touching is no problem at all. Neither is stretching out a wing to see if it needs to be clipped. Clipping his nails and wings is never a problem and I never put it off because I don't feel up to the challenge like I do with my sun conure that was a handfed baby.

The only real difference that I see is that while my other birds range from giving little pinches to a hard bite that's not intended to actually damage anything, my bcc is determined to remove as much flesh as possible in a single bite - not from me of course, from people who had moments earlier been warned not to do something and ignored the warning.

Steve - being curious
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Okay, put your eyeballs back in your head. You are not seeing things. Iam actually starting a legitimate discussion. Considering ... people who had moments earlier been warned not to do something and ignored the warning. Steve - being curious

Interesting topic. Both of my birds were hand raised, but there is an amazon that comes into the vet's office where I work. It was wild caught. We don't have many birds come into the office, but of the ones we do get, this bird is the easiest to wing and nail trim. He doesn't fight it at all.

Debbie, Dusty (CAG) and Casperella (U2)
I have several wild caught birds in my breeding flock, none are pets, none would I trust. Most are excellent breeders.
Bob W

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I was just wondering how many of you people still have a wild caught pet bird or two or three in >your flock.

A TAG, open-banded '81, a female... ex-breeder, she's fine with people now, never aggressive, except with other birds.
A BCC, cool birdie... sometimes moody, but gets along great with other birds and people.

~=Marco=~
On the subject of wild-caught, I thought the UK had made it illegal. In fact the RSPCA had Focus stop selling parrots when they found out. Yet there are LOADS of wild caught birds still imported.

What happens if you install windows 98 on a system with 2 processors? It crashes twice.
I was just wondering how many of you people still have a wild caught pet bird or two or three in >your flock.

A TAG, open-banded '81, a female... ex-breeder, she's fine with people now, never aggressive, except with other birds. A BCC, cool birdie... sometimes moody, but gets along great with other birds and people.

When you say "fine with" and "gets along" - exactly how tame are they? Will they land on your shoulder? Your hand? Let you stroke them? Kiss them? Feed them by hand?

Isn't it a bit unnerving that doctors call what they do "practice?"
I've been told, for those of us who like the songs of canaries, we

wouldn't like a wild-caught canary's song too much. I guess it's rather plain. Never heard one, though.

A wild caught canary? Didn't know there was such a beast. I thought canaries were a domestic species or the wild serin or summat.
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