I have a two year old Rhodesian Ridgeback / Lab mix that did not make it in the leader dog for the blind. He had some basic obidence with the previous owner and even start agility training.

He does not get along well with other male dogs, he lost his home because he bite the other male there. I keep him away from other dogs for now. When I walk him it is the other dogs that are usually barking / lunging at him, he "seems" not interested. I did get brave and he sniffed a small female dog briefly at the pet store.

But the distractions - squirrel's, butterflies, birds, etc. I cannot get him to seem to leave. I am having trouble getting his attention again and to perform a walk.
Guess that is problem 1.
Problem 2 - he keeps trying to run me off the side walk. With him on my left and TRYING to keep him in the heel position (I have a choker on him). If the houses / fences are on my right (meaning the road would be on his left) he moves towards my sidewalk forcing me to adjust him not only back, but over to the other side of the sidewalk. I literray run out of space.Probelm 3 - the recall. Yeah, that needs the work. In two weeks, he has gotten out 3 times. Two times we tracked him down luckily, other time we got called from the microchip. While in the car after him, we were doing about 35 miles an hour to keep up (I dont' know how that is possible). I need to go to school. I am putting him in a large cage at the end of the street and telling him to run and I go to the other side of the cage and call him, he comes usually and I praise.

But he is always running towards those doors. I was going to keep the long lead on him in the cage but he usually comes a running to a "come". I don't trust him in any other environment - I would not be able to grab the leash.
Not sure where to start - just threw it out there.
Probelm 3 - the recall. Yeah, that needs the work. In two weeks, he has gotten out 3 times. Two times we tracked him down luckily, other time we got called from the microchip.

I don't have any advice regarding your other issues, but I do on this one. Immediately start making him Sit at the door every single time. Make sure everyone in the household does it. Once you have him in a sit at the door YOU go through first, and then invite him out. I trained my guy this way from the start, and he will not go through the door unless I tell him it is okay. I see this as a safety issue. It's nice to be able to leave the door open for a minute without worrying that your dog will escape and get lost or hit by a car.
in thread "buzzsaw" (Email Removed) whittled the following words:
I have a two year old Rhodesian Ridgeback / Lab mix that did not make it in the leader dog ... to leave. I am having trouble getting his attention again and to perform a walk. Guess that is problem 1.

I would see that he gets his curiosity sated until which time he can do obedience on a longe line with those distractions present. Training an obedient dog does not mean training so they are obedient only when conditions are perfect. And obedient dog is trained in mayhem, so when mayhem occurs, their training holds.
I had a dog like that last summer, and I ran him on the ATV for 5 miles a day at a fairly fast clip, and when he got done, he was ready to settle down and train. And when we trained, I made sure we trained in Mayhem. And he did quite well. Several others (trainers) had given up on him and asked me if i would take him for a couple months. The dog rehomed, and the training held, and the new home still writes to me, bragging about how delighted they are with him.
I'm not sure what it takes to wear this dog out, and the degree of his ADD. I don't think I could have trained the above said dog without an ATV. But a tired dog is not only a good dog, they train easily too.
I have a two year old Rhodesian Ridgeback / Lab mix that did not make it in the leader dog for the blind. He had some basic obidence with the previous owner and even start agility training.

Take a class that will teach you how to communicate with (train) your dog. People aren't born understanding dogs. Body language and timng are huge part of successful training. You need someone who knows what they are doing to watch you and let you know when you are too late, too early, not clear etc. There are just so many things that people do accidentally that confuses their dogs. You need somone to make you aware of those confusing things so you don't do them and so you can be clear for your dog. Then if you have a specific problem you and the person you are working with can address it.

Diane Blackman
http://dog-play.com /
http://dogplay.com/Shop/dogplayshop.htm
That's ironic .. one of the things I do to wear him out is letting him running free in this large cage (tennis court). While he is running, I call him and he comes, I reward and then let me run again. After 20, 30 minutes he is pooped.
But maybe after sometime in the cage I can put the line on and do the recall ?
I have no other way to wear him out.
Date: Mon, 27 Jun 2005 23:41:47 GMT
Local: Mon,Jun 27 2005 7:41 pm
Subject: Re: Collars
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()
For the most recent example, see: Lucy She can't fathom ... How is it even possible to educate someone this stupid?

He was next to me and I could see his neck muscles pulsing. He didn't even blink an eye. Janet Boss

An INSENSITIVE DOG???
I can't remember what model of Innotek I have, but I had apointer ignore a neck-muscle-pulsing 9.

() RIGHT THERE, she goes beyond stupidity and into the twilight zone. Do you think it's possible for someone like that to understand much of anything?

In a word, no. That's why I'm going to do my very best to ignore her from now on.
It'll be hard, of course, because I, like so many others, am always drawn to accident scenes.
()
But I use e-collars too. With one of my dogs and with some clients. For circumstances where a physical collar and leash is not the right answer. I'm sure Lucy has no clue what THAT means!

One can only wonder how long it would take someone of Lucy's, shall we say "aptitude," to learn how to use an e-collar correctly if she can't even grasp the fundamentals of using a simple choke chain.

Handsome Jack Morrison
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Subject: Re: Collars
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It stands for what the collar can do (so can ... when it's used by an incompetent, inexperienced, or sadistic trainer.

I've never assumed that Lynn, or you, or any experienced trainer would choke a dog to death; but I suppose that something giving the dog the sensation of choking must be happening,

No, it's not. You're speaking from IGNORANCE here.

In fact, a good trainer works very hard to prevent any choking action from taking place (as I explained to you, fruitlessly apparently, in a previous post) by keeping the leash at all times *loose.*
Put your leash on your* dog (with any collar you want) and, while keeping the leash *loose,* try to choke *your dog.

Let me know how that works out for you, 'kay?
Note: It is impossible to administer a proper leash correction (with a training/choke/prong collar) if the leash is tight, because the collar can't then be "popped," which essentially works as a sound distraction (a "tap on the shoulder" to signal to the dog that what he just did was unacceptable, etc.)
E-collars, too, can be used in exactly that same way (among several other ways).
and it must be really convincing in order to force the dog to obey, rather than experience it.

There's no force involved in a collar pop, provided it's executed correctly and *timely.*
None. Nada. Zero. Zilch.
()
Many women wear a type of necklace called a choker, right? ttp://www.novica.com/art/hand=ADmade-jewelry/ necklaces/choker-=ADnecklaces... How often do you see them actually choking and gasping for air?

How often do you see anyone using those necklaces in order to make a woman do whatever they want her to do (other than giving the necklace to her as a gift)?

Because words alone apparently scare the crap out of you, Lucy, which apparently causes your brain to lockup (like the jaws on an eeevil pitbull Emotion: smile)I offered you the example of the necklace choker, because you were wondering why one wouldn't use a choke collar unless one intended to actually choke a dog.
Using that same brilliant logic of yours, and applying it to the necklace choker, it begs the same question, doesn't it?
Why would anyone buy someone a choker necklace if the intention wasn't to actually choke that person.

Handsome Jack Morrison
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