Our vet, after already diagnosing the issue during an office visit, has told us that it is "policy" that worming pills only be given by their staff in-house ($20 per pill per cat).
We have two cats, both of which are, to say the least, not happy about being carted off to the vet and/or riding in the car. Frankly, it makes little sense to me that these pills (one each per cat) cannot be administered by us at home as we have "pilled " a cat regularly, but the vet office maintains that their policy is based on individuals who are unable to properly administer pills and/or do it at the right time (but, who, I would think, could always request the vet to do this).

Does anyone know if this "policy" is common or standard practice and what the appropriate cost for one of these pills should be without the service of putting the pill in the cat's mouth? We like the vet but this practice seems extremely rigid, and given the discomfort of the trip, not necessarily in the cats' best interests. Thanks in advance.
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It is not standard procedure at my vet's. I bring in a stool sample, and if the cat has worms, I am able to pick up the pills or liquid and administer it myself.
gail
Same here. Our poor kitty was a feral and had round worms and tape worms. We bought the medicine from the vet and administered it ourselves. Don't know ANY reason or what the value add would be to have a vet do it. Other than greed or profiteering.
Same here. Our poor kitty was a feral and had round worms and tape worms. We bought the medicine from ... ANY reason or what the value add would be to have a vet do it. Other than greed or profiteering.

Same here.
I can even get antibiotics for my sometimes-sickly baby without bringing her in at this point, because the vet knows us and knows she has a recurrent URI.

~kaeli~
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Our vet, after already diagnosing the issue during an office visit, has told us that it is "policy" that worming pills only be given by their staff in-house ($20 per pill per cat).

This is not standard procedure with my vet. He will administer a pill (worming or any other type) if the cat is already in his examining room for an evaluation. There is no charge for administering the pill I am billed the standard examination charge plus the cost of the medication, but there is no "extra" charge for giving injections or pills. If a sequence of pills is needed, I am giving the medication to take home with me so that I can administer them myself. Like one of the others said, it might not even be necessary to bring the cat in if a fecal sample shows the presence of worms. Medication is prescribed and sent home with the caregiver.

In your case, I believe I would look around and see if there are other reputable vets in your area with a different "policy." This sounds more like a revenue-producing policy than a standard medical policy.

MaryL
(take out the litter to reply)
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Last time my cat took de-worming medicine, the vet sent me home with two needleless syringes and told me when to squirt them in my cat's mouth. I have also had the Rx drugs amoxicillin and Acepr given to me by my vet for me to administer at home at the appropriate times.
Yesterday I saw some online prescription drug companies that apparently have U.S. licensed doctors standing by to take a patient's symptoms over email or the Internet and write a prescription. It looked like some companies did this with vets, too. For example,

http://www.prescription-pro.com/Amoxicillin.html .

Has anyone tried any such online Rx drug company/distributor? If so, what was the name of the online company and how was the experience?
Does anyone know if this "policy" is common or standard practice and what the appropriate cost for one of these ... seems extremely rigid, and given the discomfort of the trip, not necessarily in the cats' best interests. Thanks in advance.

Well, our vet uses a one-time injection for deworming, not pills, so yes, he has us bring the cat to the office if a stool sample shows worms. For other pills, no, he's never charged for pilling even with a fractious cat. Normally he (or one of the vet techs) might administer the first pill in the office, then send us home with the prescription and instructions. I can't imagine having to bring the cat in for pilling if it's a series of pills, such as twice a day over a course of several days or weeks.
The only reason I can think of for your vet's policy is that some people may decide to go buy over the counter pills instead and he wants to make sure they are getting the proper medication. But a $20 pillling fee sounds excessive.
Our vet, after already diagnosing the issue during an office visit, has told us that it is "policy" that worming ... seems extremely rigid, and given the discomfort of the trip, not necessarily in the cats' best interests. Thanks in advance.

Mine sends it home with me if needed. I don't think it's an across the board thing.
Karen
Our vet, after already diagnosing the issue during an office visit, has told us that it is "policy" that worming ... seems extremely rigid, and given the discomfort of the trip, not necessarily in the cats' best interests. Thanks in advance.

I cannot understand why a prescription is required for Drontal. This is the best deworming medication I know and it is harmless. Drontal does not require a prescription here (very few pharmaceuticals do) and I have never heard of any pet having a problem because of Drontal usage w/out prescription or even veterinary advice. I routinely use Drontal once a year even if my cats show no signs of worms and about every owner I know here does the same. Aspirin is at least 100 times more dangerous and it does not need a prescription, right? Now your vet making you bring the cat in just to be given a pill is abusive - not to mention the price. I´d change vets for sure and let him know why you´re not going back to his clinic.
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