The feral kitten I adopted around six weeks ago had a host of issues, round worms being one of them. She was given three cycles of worm medicine but her poops are starting to become runny again and I found a hardened white rice-like looking-thing around her anus a couple of days ago. I still have quite a bit of worm medicine left over. Is it okay to give her another round of worm medicine or should I call the vet? Otherwise, she's fine. Spunky, eating well, going to the bathroom regularly.
Noreen
1 2 3
Hi Noreen,
Call the vet, this sounds like tape worms. The regular round worm medication doesn't get rid of tape worms, so you'll need to get something different for that. One of my rescue kittens had it and they just gave him 1 pill. Didn't cause him any obvious problems.
Debbie Berry
Take a fresh stool sample to your vet. What you describe is tapeworm, which requires another medication. But the kitten may have other problems such as good old coccidia, which requires yet another medication and which can kill.
We generally check more than once, to rule out new nasties rearing their heads when one nasty is erradicated. And sometimes that first check overlooks coccidia.
Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus (feral) Cats
www.campuscats.org
Call the vet, this sounds like tape worms. The regular round worm medication doesn't get rid of tape worms, so you'll need to get something different for that. One of my rescue kittens had it and they just gave him 1 pill. Didn't cause him any obvious problems.
She did have tape worms and the vet gave her a shot to get rid of them. So does that mean the shot may not have worked after all? This was about six weeks ago. I thought the shot for tape worms was supposed to be more effective than the pills.
Noreen
We generally check more than once, to rule out new nasties rearing their heads when one nasty is erradicated. And sometimes that first check overlooks coccidia.
Thanks, Sharon. What is the test for coccidia? Do you have any favorite web sites which explains this disease?
Noreen
: We generally check more than once, to rule out new nasties rearing their : heads when one nasty is erradicated. And sometimes that first check : overlooks coccidia. Thanks, Sharon. What is the test for coccidia?

A fecal exam for oocysts is the best test for a definitive diagnosis.

Coccidiosis must be diagnosed and treated quickly because it causes a rapid loss of the intestinal mucosal lining.
Coccidia reproduce themselves inside the cells that line the intestinal tract when the new parasites are released from cells, the intestinal cells are killed in the process. The life cycle of coccidia takes only a few hours to a few days, so they can do a lot of damage to the intestinal mucosa in a short time.
Also, what looks like a persistent infection is usually re-infection.
Do you have any favorite
web sites which explains this disease?

http://www.maxshouse.com/Parasites Internal.htm
You might want to have the kitten tested or re-tested for giardia. Routine fecal tests usually produce false-negatives for giardia. Giardia requires a special test and many (most) vets don't have the time or simply don't want to spend the time to run the test. The test requires a special flotation solution (zinc sulfate) and the fecal sample must be centrifuged for 5 minutes (centrifugation forces the giardia cyst to float in the zinc sulfate) and then read immediately because the cysts shrink and may become difficult to identify..
Good luck.
Phil
Do you have any favorite
web sites which explains this disease?

http://www.maxshouse.com/Parasites Internal.htm
Of course, Phil, I should have checked out your web site first. :-) Thanks so much for the detailed information. The reason I think it might be a reinfestation of round worms is her poops were runny when we adopted her, she was given worm medicine, the poops solidified, just before she was ready for her next dose of worm medicine, the poops became runny again, etc. But even if she's had her three doses of worm medicine, there's still a chance the worms are present, yes?

Plus, I thought once she had a tape worm shot, that was it. No more tapeworms. The other two cats in our house also had the tapeworm shot, too.
Anyway, she's quite the keeper. Bullseye is a silvery-grey, domestic shorthair, mackeral tabby. She was raised entirely outdoors by a feral mother yet has plenty excitement staying indoors discovering magic objects such as mirrors. This little kitten who would run at the sight of humans has now become more of a lap cat than my other two cats which are highly domesticated.
I'll set up an appointment with the vet today (she's been checked out by not one, but two, vets so far) and see if they are missing anything.

Noreen
I was surprised that your vet gave an injection for tapeworm, when a single (much cheaper and non-invasive and not at all painful) pill does the trick.
The thing about tapeworm is that they are passed via fleas. The pill kills all the resident worms in one go, but the next flea the kitten injests (yuck) may be a tapeworm carrier, so the cycle starts over. The way to control tapeworm is via flea control. Program or Advantage do that very well.
Coccidia (and any other intestinal parasites) are detected via microscope examination of a fecal smear. We may have a short blurb about coccidia on our website, but a quick googling should give you more info that you ever wanted to know. Coccidia can't be seen with the naked eye, but the most common symptom is diarrhea (often with blood/mucus).

Take care.
Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats
www.campuscats.org
Shelter kittens or rescue kittens sometimes need multiple wormings. Sometimes they become reinfected if they have not been removed from the source. Sometimes, though, another parasite has moved into the "niche" created by the first worming. Which is why I recommend a fecal. \

Phil, do you recall how many kinds of cooties panacur kills? That's one we sometimes use at least the first time around.
Sharon Talbert
Friends of Campus Cats
www.campuscats.org
Show more